December 4, 2016
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Broadband Adoption: Not One Size Fits All

Commentary by David Honig, President and Executive Director, Minority Media and Telecommunications Council

WASHINGTON -  Technology is rapidly becoming an integral part of life across every generation. The Pew Internet & American Life Project recently reported that the vast majority (90 percent) of Americans now own a cell phone, while significant numbers also own either a laptop or desktop computer (70 and 57 percent, respectively). Younger adults (those under the age of 35) have a demonstrated preference for increased mobility, choosing laptops over desktop computers and using their cell phones to access a variety of applications such as Internet, e-mail, music, games, and video. Older adults are less likely to own these types of devices and remain far behind when it comes to broadband adoption. Overall, however, Pew reports that there has been an upward trend in technology use across every generation.

Despite this positive advancement, a sizeable gap in technology adoption and utilization remains across generations. This begs the question: How can we ensure that every American, regardless of age, race, or circumstance, has access to – and understands how to use – the incredible number of innovative products and services currently available?

First and foremost, it is imperative that policymakers recognize that broadband adoption efforts must be tailored to specific demographics. One size will not fit all. Innovators are certainly recognizing this, as user group-specific technology organizations and initiatives are rapidly emerging. One such organization is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s AgeLab, where researchers are designing and producing an array of revolutionary products for older Americans that aid them in maintaining their health, independence, and quality of life. Many of these innovations are targeted at aging Baby Boomers, a segment of the population that will contribute to a doubling of the senior citizen population over the next few decades.

Another group focused exclusively on increasing broadband adoption for senior citizens is Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), a nonprofit organization based in Brooklyn, NY. By providing training and focusing on social engagement, health, financial security, and creative expression, OATS is attempting to change the way Americans age by leveraging the transformative power of broadband.

One Economy and the Broadband Opportunity Coalition share a similar goal, only their focus is on low-income and minority groups who remain on the wrong side of the digital divide. One key aspect of this joint effort is a nationwide broadband awareness campaign that will target its messaging at these particular groups of non-adopters.

Yet another targeted broadband adoption effort can be found in New York City public schools, where the city’s Department of Education is using $22 million in stimulus funds to create a program dedicated to bringing broadband and laptop computers into an array of middle schools across the city. This program provides students and their families with computers, training, and subsidized in-home broadband connections. The goal of the program is to bolster broadband adoption in low-income households and ensure that the students are able to fully participate in the 21st century workforce.

Overall, broadband adoption efforts are most successful when they are tailored to address the specific needs of individual demographic groups. There are many impressive programs already in existence, but we need more – many more. In order to close the digital divide once and for all, policymakers must encourage more of these initiatives through additional funding opportunities and practical policies that create additional vehicles for bringing more people online.

 

The Minority Media and Telecommunications Council (MMTC) was founded in 1986. MMTC has represented over 70 minority, civil rights and religious national organizations in selected proceedings before the FCC, and it operates the nation’s only full service, minority owned media and telecom brokerage.


STORY TAGS: Broadband Adoption , Pew , internet and american life project , Minority Media Telecommunications councilGeneral, Black News, African American News, Latino News, Hispanic News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality



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