December 21, 2014
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College Sport Improves Racial Hiring Practices


ORLANDO, FL - The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida has issued its College Sport Racial and Gender Report Card today.

College sport increased its grade for racial hiring practices from a C+ to a B in the 2010 College Sport Racial and Gender Report Card while maintaining a strong B for gender hiring practices. The combined grade was a solid B.

College sport received the B for racial hiring practices by earning 81.9 points, up from 76.2 points in the 2008 College RGRC, the last report where a grade was issued. College sport received the B for gender hiring practices by earning 82.3 points, up from 80.7 points in the 2008 College RGRC. The combined grade was raised from a C+ (78.5) to a B (82.1).

“College sport made a substantial improvement on racial hiring practices as well as progress on gender hiring practices,” said Richard Lapchick, principal author of the study and director of The Institute. “There have been well-publicized improvements in head football coaching positions, but this shows improvement across the board for both race and gender.”

Lapchick added, “However, there are some big areas of concern. There has been an outstanding record for equal opportunity when it comes to men’s head basketball coaches. In this latest study, in men’s Division I basketball, 21.0 percent of all head coaches were African-American, which was down 1.9 percentage points from the last report and down 4.2 percentage points from the 2005-06 season ,when there was an all-time high of 25.2 percent of our coaches who were African-American.

“Also, all our conference commissioners at FBS conferences are white men. Finally, only 8.3 percent of Division I athletics directors are women. College sport received its only F’s in these categories.”

READ FULL REPORT HERE

Below are some of the report’s highlights:

University Leadership Positions at Football Bowl Subdivision Institutions

• Positive gains were made by African-Americans in the role of university president at the 120 FBS Institutions. There are now five African-Americans, representing a 0.8 percentage point increase.

• 92.5 percent of FBS university presidents were white, while there were two Asian presidents (0.8 percentage point increase) and two Latino presidents (0.8 percentage point decrease). However, there were no Native American university presidents.

• The level of diversity within the athletic director position at FBS schools declined from last year’s study, as 14 (11.7 percent) people of color hold this position. However, this total does not include any women of color.

• With the addition of six new African‐American head coaches at FBS schools before the 2010 season (Charlie Strong, University of Louisville; Joker Phillips, University of Kentucky; Mike London, University of Virginia; Ruffin McNeill, East Carolina University; Larry Porter, University of Memphis; Willie Taggart, Western Kentucky University), the overall number of African‐American head coaches from 2008 increased from seven to 13. This past offseason, the hiring of Jon Embree at Colorado, Darrell Hazell at Kent State, Don Treadwell at Miami (Ohio), David Shaw at Stanford and James Franklin at Vanderbilt, coupled with the dismissal of Randy Shannon at Miami (FL) and Mike Haywood at Pittsburgh, brought the number of African-American head coaches to 16.

• The 18 coaches of color who will start the 2011 season represents the highest number and percentage of coaches of color ever at FBS schools. This included coaches in the ACC, SEC, Big East, Big 12 and Pac-10.

• Of the 266 offensive and defensive coordinators in the FBS, there were three more African-American coordinators from last year’s total of 30.

NCAA Headquarters

· At the high levels of the NCAA headquarters in the EVP/SVP/VP positions, the number of people of color increased by one to four, while women decreased by one to three. African-Americans continue to be the only people of color represented at the EVP/SVP/VP level occupying 25 percent (up 1.5 percentage points) of the positions. Whites held the remaining 75 percent of the positions.

 

· While the number of people of color remained the same in positions at the managing director/director level, the percentage decreased slightly by 0.4 percentage points to 23.9 percent. Women held 45.1 percent of the positions at the managing director/director level, an increase of 3.7 percentage points.

Note: The number of Latinos remained the same in these positions. The number of Asians increased from one to two as a result of a change in reporting for an individual who was previously reported as Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander but is now reflected as Asian in our reporting.

• At the administrator level, the percentage of people of color decreased due to a drop in the number of minorities by five. The percentage of African Americans decreased to 16.2 percent (down 1.8 percentage points) while Latino representation rose slightly to 2.1 percent (up 0.1 percentage points). Asian representation increased to 2.6 percent (up 0.6 percentage points). The number of white NCAA administrators decreased by nine. The percentage of white administrators in these positions, however, increased by 1.1 percentage points to 79.1 percent. Although the number of women in administrative positions decreased by five to 104, on a percentage point basis they increased by 1.3 to 54.5 percent.

• Within the support staff position level at the headquarters, which includes all levels of assistants, the percentage of people of color increased 0.2 percentage points to 19.2 percent, while women decreased 1.7 percentage points to 93.3 percent. This drop occurred after the percentage of women at the support level was at its highest recorded level last year since the NCAA began reporting demographic data in 1998.

Conference Commissioners

• Once again, 100 percent of the 11 Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, conference commissioners were white men.

• In all of Division I, excluding the Historically Black conferences, all 30 (100 percent) of Division I conference commissioners were white. Five were led by white women, accounting for 16.7 percent of the commissioners.

• In terms of associate commissioner roles at the FBS level, there are 18 women occupying these posts.

Student-athletes

· In Division I football, African-Americans account for 45.8 percent of the athletes and whites hold 45.1 percent, indicating the levels of participation between these two races continue to remain very close.

 

•In Division I basketball, African-Americans account for 60.9 percent of the athletes and whites hold 30.5 percent.

• African-American female student-athletes accounted for 51 percent of the Division I basketball participants, representing a 0.5 percentage point decrease from last year.

• In Division I softball, Latinas saw a 0.1 percentage point increase to 7.4 percent, continuing the trend of increased participation by this demographic in every year since 2001-02.

• People of color had 22.5 percent of the softball positions while having only 16.6 percent of the men’s baseball positions.

• The percentage of white male athletes in all Division I stands at 62.5 percent, which is a decrease of 1.3 percentage points. Of all Division I male athletes, 24.9 percent are African-American, representing an increase of 0.1 percentage points from last year’s total.

• The percentage of white male student-athletes at the Division I, II and III combined were 70.4 percent, 18.7 percent for African-American males, 4.3 percent for Latinos, 1.5 percent for Asian men and 0.3 percent for American Indian/Alaskan Natives males.

•The percentage of white female student-athletes at the Division I, II and III combined were 77.2 percent, 11.6 percent for African-American females, 4.0 percent for Latinas, 1.5 percent for Asian females and 0.3 percent for American Indian/Alaskan Native females.

Coaching

· Whites dominate the head coaching ranks on men’s teams holding 89.3 percent, 89.2 percent and 92.3 percent of all head coaching positions in Divisions I, II and III, respectively.

 

• African-Americans held 6.6 percent, 4.8 percent and 3.7 percent of the men’s head coaching positions in the three NCAA divisions, respectively.

• Likewise on the women’s teams, whites held 87.7 percent, 89.5 percent and 91.9 percent of all head coaching positions in Divisions I, II and III, respectively.

• African-Americans held 7.2 percent, 4.8 percent, and 3.9 percent of the women’s head coaching positions in the three NCAA divisions, respectively.

• In men’s Division I basketball, 21.0 percent of all head coaches were African-American, which was down 1.9 percentage points from last report and down 4.2 percentage points from the 2005-06 season, when there was an all-time high of 25.2 percent of men’s head basketball coaches who were African-American. This is a big area of concern in the RGRC.

• Only 5.5 percent of Division I head baseball coaches were people of color, with 2.6 percent Latino and only 1.1 percent African-American.

• In fact, African-Americans were so underrepresented as head coaches, that once again, the percent of women coaching men’s teams actually exceeded that of African-Americans in Division III (4.6 percent versus 3.7 percent.) In Division II, the percentage of women coaching men’s teams was similarly low to the percentage of African-Americans (3.5 percent versus 4.8 percent).

• More than three-and-a-half decades after the passage of Title IX, women coaching women’s teams still do not represent the majority of coaches in the women’s game. In addition, this year’s numbers show no progress in women coaching women’s sports in most sports. Women head coaches in Division I basketball increased slightly (65.9 percent in 2009-10 and 64.7 percent in 2007-08). Head coaches of Division I Track/Cross Country, which combines the head coaches of Cross Country, Indoor Track and Outdoor Track, saw a slight decrease in female head coaches from 20.2 percent in 2007-08 to 19.7 percent in 2009-10. In all other sports, men led 55.5 percent of the women’s teams while women were head coaches in only 45.5 percent of the programs.

• African-American women held 11.4 percent and African-American men held 3.9 percent of women’s head coaching positions in Division I basketball for a combined percentage of 15.3 percent (up from 13.6 percent). Nonetheless, the 13.6 percent stood in stark contrast to the 51.5 percent of the student-athletes playing women’s basketball who were African-American.

• On the men’s teams in 2009-10, whites held 76.8, 79.5, and 87.3 percent of the assistant coaching positions in the three divisions, respectively, which was slightly improved from 76.9, 79.0, and 88.1 percent respectively in 2008. In 2009-10, African-Americans held 18.1, 13.3, and 8.1 percent, respectively.

• Among the women’s teams in 2009-10, whites held 78.8, 81.8, and 88.9 percent of the assistant coaching positions in Divisions I, II and III, respectively, which was comparable to the 79.1, 81.2 and 88.8 percent respectively in 2007-08. In 2009-10 African-Americans had 14.2, 9.7, and 5.9 percent respectively. In 2007-08 African-American held 13.5, 10.3 and 6.4 percent of the assistant coaching jobs on women’s teams in the respective Divisions.

• The percentage of women assistants on women’s teams declined in Division I and Division III and saw a slight increase at the Division II level. As assistants, women in 2009-10 held 49.0 percent of the positions in Division I, 49.7 percent in Division II and 49.3 percent in Division III.

Athletics Directors

• Whites held the overwhelming percentage of positions of athletics directors in all three divisions at 88.8, 92.7, and 96.2 percent in Divisions I, II and III, respectively. This compared to 90.0, 92.0 and 97.0 percent in 2007-08 respectively.

• African-Americans held 7.4, 3.1 and 2.2 percent respectively in Divisions I, II and III. This compared to 7.2 percent, 3.8 percent and 1.8 percent in 2006 respectively.

• Latinos accounted for 2.2, 3.1, and 0.4 percent of the ADs at Division I, II and III. This compared to 1.9, 3.0 and 0.0 percent in 2008 respectively.

• Asians accounted for 0.0, 0.8, and 0.6 percent of the ADs at Division I, II and III and Native Americans accounted for 0.9, 0.0, and 0.2 percent of the ADs at each level.

• Women lost ground as athletics directors in Divisions II and gained ground in Divisions I and III since the last Report Card in 2008. At the Division II level, the percentage of female athletic directors dropped slightly by 0.1 percentage points to 15.5 percent. In contrast, the percentage of female athletic directors increased to 8.3 percent (up 0.5 percentage points) and 27.4 percent (up 0.3 percentage points) in Division I and Division III respectively.

College Associate and Assistant Athletic Directors

• At the associate athletic director position, whites comprised 88.5, 82.8, and 92.6 percent of the total population at Division I, II and III respectively. These numbers were all lower than that of 2007-08 (89.2, 88.8 and 96.4 percent respectively). African-Americans held 8.2, 14.4, and 5.4 percent of the positions at each level. Latinos held 1.8 percent, 1.0 percent and 0.4 percent of the positions at each level. Asians held 0.7 percent and 1.0 percent in Divisions I and II. There were no Asians in Division III in this position and no Native Americans in Divisions II and III. In Division I, Native Americans had 0.3 percent of the associate athletic director positions.

• The percentage of women filling associate athletic director positions was 31.1 percent in Division I, 42.0 percent in Division II and 46.1 percent in Division III.

• Women held 100 percent of the Senior Woman Administrator jobs in Division I, II and III. White women continued to dominate the SWA position holding 85.1, 81.1, and 93.7 percent in Division I, II and III, respectively. African-American women represented 10.1, 15.4 and 4.2 percent at each respective level.

• Whites continue to fill the majority of the FAR positions with 84.4, 86.4 and 94.2 percent in Divisions I, II and III, respectively.

 

The Racial and Gender Report Card is issued sport-by-sport. The College Racial and Gender Report Card is the sixth and final report issued in 2010-2011 after the releases on Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the Women’s National Basketball Association, the National Football League and Major League Soccer. The complete Racial and Gender Report Card will be issued hereafter.

 


STORY TAGS: Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport , TIDES , University of Central Florida , College Sport Racial and Gender Report CardBlack News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, Women News, Minority News, Discrimination, Diversity, Female, Underrepresented, Equality, Gender Bias, Equality, Hispanic News, Latino News, Mexican News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Latina, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

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