December 10, 2016
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National Survey of Undocumented Immigrants Points To Big Turn Out In 2010 Census


 

SAN ANTONIO,  -- RedBrownandBlue.com (RBB), a news and commentary website aiming to increase multicultural perspectives in mainstream media -- in conjunction with Interlex Communications, a Top 25 Hispanic-owned advertising agency -- has released important data pointing to a potentially unprecedented turnout in 2010 Census participation by undocumented Latino immigrants.

With 1100 undocumented immigrants interviewed in six cities -- New YorkLos Angeles,HoustonPhoenixMiami and Washington, DC -- 76 percent of all respondents said they would participate in the 2010 Census. Furthermore, of respondents who have lived in the U.S. 10 years or more, 43 percent said they participated in the 2000 Census and 85 percent said they would participate in the 2010 Census.

"The increased participation could be the result of a perfect storm," says Rudy Ruiz, founding editor of RedBrownandBlue.com. "Never in the history of the Census has so much been invested in ensuring that Latinos, especially the undocumented, participate in this milestone. The Census Bureau has gone to great lengths to reach out and dispel myths and misconceptions about the Census among the undocumented, helping dissipate fears of deportation by participation."

The US Census reportedly spent 20 percent of its total advertising budget on paid ads aimed at the Hispanic community, mainly Spanish speakers, to increase Hispanic Census participation.

"But there's more to it than that," continues Ruiz. "This is a sign, along with the marches and the growing calls for immigration reform, that undocumented immigrants are yearning to come out of the shadows, be counted, and be given a legitimate shot at contributing to -- and partaking in -- the American Dream."

National Results*

  • 76 percent of undocumented immigrants said they would participate in the U.S. Census
  • 16 percent of undocumented immigrants said they would not participate in the U.S. Census
  • 8 percent of undocumented immigrants said they don't know whether they will participate
  • 24 percent of undocumented immigrants said they have participated in a U.S. Census before
  • 72 percent of undocumented immigrants said they have not participated in a U.S. Census before
  • 4 percent of undocumented immigrants said they don't know if they have participated in a U.S. Census before

*National results encompass all undocumented Latino immigrants surveyed, including those who have been in the country less than 10 years.

City-to-City Comparisons

  • Undocumented immigrants in Washington, DC ranked first in declared participation at 86 percent; Los Angeles at 81 percent; Miami at 80 percent; Houston at 72 percent; Phoenix at 71 percent; and New York at 63 percent

  • Of those undocumented immigrants who declared they would not participate, New York ranked first at 35 percent;Phoenix at 26 percent; Houston at 15 percent; Los Angeles at 8 percent; Miami at 7 percent; and Washington DC at 6 percent

  • Of those respondents who said they don't know whether they will participate; Houston and Miami ranked first at 13 percent, Los Angeles at 11 percent; Washington, DC at 8 percent; and New York and Phoenix at 3 percent

  • Of those respondents who have been in the United States for 10 or more years, in Phoenix more than half – 61 percent – said they have participated in a U.S. Census before; New York at 60 percent; Washington, DC at 44 percent; Houston at 43 percent; Los Angeles at 31 percent; and Miami at 25 percent

  • Of those respondents who said they have been in the United States for 10 or more years and have not participated in a U.S. Census; Miami ranked first at 73 percent; Los Angeles at 63 percent; Washington, DC at 56 percent; Houstonat 48 percent; New York at 40 percent; and Phoenix at 38 percent

"When you compare the numbers of undocumented immigrants who did not participate in the Census ten years ago to those who will participate in the 2010 Census, one can predict that the projections of Latinos living in the United States will be impacted profoundly, from accelerating growth projections to reshaping immigration reform dialogue," says Brittani Pena, research director for RedBrownandBlue.com, who oversaw the execution of the survey. "Immigration is a polarizing subject matter, but once we grasp the true number of undocumented immigrants living in the United States, it may give immigration reform a new urgency that those on both sides of the political aisle will share."

"The increased turnout should also have a major positive impact on Census-based funding for communities with large undocumented populations," adds Ruiz.

The Census participation section of RBB's research project was a small part of the 70-question survey. RBB will announce more compelling data throughout 2010, dealing with a variety of hot-button issues concerning undocumented immigrants.

According to Ruiz, "The results will challenge public perception of this group, as well as impact public policy discussions on the kinds of immigration reform being proposed by Congress."

Methodology

RBB's Survey of Undocumented Latino Immigrants is comprised of 1,100 Spanish-language surveys conducted betweenDecember 2009 and January 2010 in six U.S. cities including HoustonLos AngelesPhoenixMiamiNew York, and theWashington DC metropolitan area. The markets were selected based on their Hispanic composition and population concentration. According to the Department of Homeland Security, CaliforniaTexasFloridaNew York, and Arizona are among the top ten states with the highest concentration of undocumented immigrants.

Surveys were conducted at Laundromats, areas where the segment congregates to find day labor, immigration centers, and flea markets. Participants were required to be at least 18 years of age, be of Hispanic origin, and living and working inthe United States without legal permission.  The survey included questions on immigration reform, adaption to the American lifestyle, the 2010 Census, experiences in the U.S., racism and discrimination, and demographics.

 

SOURCE RedBrownandBlue.com



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