February 18, 2020         
EWA Is Proud to Announce That Voviette Morgan, Special Agent in Charge, Los Angeles Office FBI, Has Been Selected for the EWA Ja   •   Lovers, Sub a Sandwich for a Ring This Leap Day and Quiznos May Cater Your Wedding – Assuming They Say “Yes”!   •   Santa Maria Philharmonic Presents Annual Youth Showcase   •   AARP Nevada And Las Vegas Review-Journal Partner For Nevada Caucus Voter Education Campaign And Event   •   New ESA ‘Game Generation’ Campaign Shows Video Game Play Brings Benefits Beyond Fun   •   Fulton Mortgage Company Honored With First Annual Community Revitalization Award in Philadelphia   •   Comcast Celebrates the Year of the Rat With Continued Sponsorship of San Francisco’s Chinese New Year Festival & Parad   •   Bounce to World Premiere New Original Black History Month Special Starring Queen Latifah, Common and Harry Belafonte Monday, Feb   •   MISSION BBQ Customers Donate $350,420 to Wreaths Across America   •   iPhone 11 Pro doubles radiation exposure deemed safe for consumers, according to new test   •   Hemp Depot Redefines U.S. CBD Farming Economics With 70% Reduction in Feminized Seed Pricing   •   Inspīr Carnegie Hill Appoints Renowned New York University Neuroscientist, Dr. Wendy Suzuki to Advisory Board   •   Make Vision Care a Priority in 2020   •   Free Dental Care for Kids at GDA Foundation Give Kids a Smile Day   •   7,000 Bacardi Employees Turn on Their ‘Out of Office’ to Visit Hundreds of Bars Across the Globe to Spark Conversati   •   M&T Bank Designated as a Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality   •   The Author Incubator Launches New Program for Spanish Speaking Entrepreneurs   •   To Honor World Cancer Day, The WISDOM Study Seeks Support from Women to Modernize Breast Screening Guidelines   •   To Honor World Cancer Day, The WISDOM Study Seeks Support from Women to Modernize Breast Screening Guidelines   •   Cruise Planners' CEO and Founder Michelle Fee Inducted into Sandals Resort International's Hall of Fame as Strong Female Executi
Bookmark and Share

Stossel Not Backing Down From Criticism Of Civil Rights Act

 

Media Matters For America, by Matt Gertz

We've previously noted that Fox Business host John Stossel called for the repeal of the public accommodations section of the Civil Rights Act "because private business ought to get to discriminate" in a Fox News appearance, then defended his claim in FoxBusiness.com blog posts. Stossel's comments provoked outrage, but he has no intention of lying low and waiting for the heat to die down; today, he has a new column pushing similar claims.

It's worth pointing out that yesterday, in a near-unanimous resolution, the Kentucky Senate rebuked Republican Senate candidate Rand Paul for similar remarks. The resolution -- co-sponsored by all but one member of the Kentucky Senate -- states that the provision in question, Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, "announced to the world that the United States would no longer tolerate discrimination against anyone on the basis of race, gender, religion, or ethnicity, and set the standard for future conduct by private business."

The resolution adds that while "suggestions have appeared recently that we retreat from the core values of the protection of equal rights of the citizens of the United States, the Senate of the General Assembly finds that these views are outside the mainstream of American values and are not supported by other than an extreme minority of persons in the United States."

Fox, meanwhile, has offered no such criticism of Stossel. Its silence is deafening.

Stossel writes:

America's fundamental political philosophy has deteriorated quite a bit if we can't distinguish between government and private conduct. I enthusiastically support the parts of the Civil Rights act that struck down Jim Crow laws, which required segregation in government facilities, mass transit, and sometimes in private restaurants and hotels. Jim Crow was evil. It had no place in America.

Racist policies in private restaurants are also evil, but they do not involve force. Government is force, so it should not be used to combat nonviolent racism on private property, even property open to the public.

But as The Washington Post's Charles Lane has pointed out, "There is no such thing as 'private' discrimination with respect to a public accommodation. Like any other claimed property right, it could not exist without government support." Lane explains:

Suppose an African American customer sits down at a "whites only" restaurant and asks for dinner. The owner tells him to leave. The customer refuses and stays put. What are the owner's options at that point? He can forcibly remove the customer himself, but, as Paul concedes, that could expose the restaurateur to criminal or civil liability. So he'll have to call the cops. When they arrive, he'll have to explain his whites-only policy and ask them to remove the unwanted black man because he's violating it. But they can only do that on the basis of some law, presumably trespassing. In other words, the business owner's discriminatory edict is meaningless unless some public authority enforces it. 

Conversely, it is precisely because of this nexus between private discrimination and public enforcement that the larger community, through the political and judicial process, acquires a valid interest in legislating against discrimination. The public is entitled to say whether their tax money should pay for arresting black trespassers on whites-only property.

Stossel goes on to again claim that the public accommodation section is unnecessary, because "[t]oday, a business that doesn't hire blacks loses customers and good employees. It will atrophy, while its more inclusive competitors thrive."

As we've previously noted in responding to Stossel, it wasn't fear of "atrophy" that stopped Denny's from allegedly  racially discriminating against black patrons in the 1990s or punished Marriott International or the Hard Times Café after the September 11 attacks for allegedly discriminating against the Midwest Federation of American Syrian-Lebanese Clubs and Sikhs; it was the Department of Justice taking action under the public accommodations section.

Stossel has been allowed to advocate for the right to discriminate for too long. It's time for Fox to act
.



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News