June 2, 2020         
TherapeuticsMD Announces Appointment of James C. D’Arecca as Chief Financial Officer and Retirement of Daniel A. Cartwrigh   •   RGENIX Shows Clinical Activity of Novel Agent RGX-202 in Patients with KRAS Mutant Colorectal Cancer in Phase 1 Trial   •   Latino Business Action Network Announces 9th Cohort of the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative Education-Scaling Program   •   Maine Virtual Academy Celebrates 2020 Graduates in a COVID Era: School Will Provide Pre-Recorded Ceremonies So Families Can Acce   •   Finalists Announced for 2020 Braille Challenge Finals   •   Christopher & Banks Corporation Announces First Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call   •   Trulieve Launches Limited Edition Cartridge, Partners with Florida-Based LGBTQ+ Organizations for Pride Month   •   Essence Ventures Hires Caroline Wanga as New Chief Growth Officer   •   Sheremetyevo Airport Prioritizes the Needs of Children   •   Caps and Gowns Go On at Home: iQ Academy Minnesota to Celebrate Class of 2020 with Online Commencement   •   Statement from Ministers Carolyn Bennett, Daniel Vandal, Marc Miller and Steven Guilbeault on National Indigenous History Month   •   Wayfair to Present at the Oppenheimer 20th Annual Consumer Growth and E-Commerce Conference   •   Auction of Alamo battle relics and Republic of Texas documents takes place June 6   •   CHPA Launches Rebranding Effort as Consumer Health Becomes More Vital to Public Health   •   Rain's newly released "My Big Sister Has Diabetes" is a heartwarming perspective of a young kid whose sister is dealing with a h   •   Cedar Fair to Participate June 2nd in the Goldman Sachs 2020 Travel and Leisure Conference, Audio Webcast Available   •   The Executive Leadership Council Statement on Racial Injustice and Disparities Facing the Black Community   •   OCHIN Supports Movement for Racial Justice and Advancements in Health Equity   •   News Photographers Association of Canada Reacts to Press Freedom Violations   •   LetsGetChecked Debuts FDA EUA-Authorized At-Home Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sure-track Test
Bookmark and Share

Americans Divided On Racial Equality

 PRINCETON, NJ -- Americans are about equally divided on whether Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream of U.S. racial equality has been realized, with 51% saying it has and 49% saying it has not. Blacks (54%) are slightly more optimistic than whites (49%) that the dream has been realized.

 

Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American NewsAmericans who believe the dream has not been realized are about as likely to say the U.S. has made major progress toward attaining it as to say it has made minor progress or none at all. Thus, although a bare majority believe the dream has been realized, a total of 74% of Americans believe either that it has been realized or that major progress has been made.

The poll finds Americans have very positive views of King. Ninety-four percent rate him positively on a scale ranging from +5 (very favorable) to -5 (very unfavorable), including 69% giving him a +4 or +5 rating.

Gallup asked the same question several times in the 1960s, and the current numbers represent a dramatic shift in the way Americans view King now compared with the past. His prior ratings were at best slightly more positive than negative, and in a 1966 measurement, Americans were nearly twice as likely to have a negative (63%) as positive (33%) opinion of him. That negative evaluation was likely the result of his public opposition to the Vietnam War at a time when Americans still favored it as well as the opposition of some to the continued push for expanded civil rights and economic legislation to assist blacks.

 

In the current poll, 65% of whites and 95% of Blacks give King a +4 or +5 favorable rating.

Given the high regard Americans currently have for Dr. King, it is not surprising that 91% approve of having a national memorial to him. Blacks are essentially unanimous in their approval at 99%, while whites' support is a bit lower but still high at 89%.

Seventy percent of Americans say they are at least somewhat interested in visiting the memorial, including 28% who are very interested. Interest is much higher among blacks, with 94% saying they are interested, including 68% who are very interested.

 

King's legacy as the paramount figure in the civil rights movement is being recognized in the establishment of a national monument in his honor. His most important legacy, though, may be improvements in Black-White relations and steps toward greater racial equality in the United States. Americans clearly see progress in this regard: 89% say Black civil rights have improved over the course of their lifetime. Still, Americans believe there is work to be done, as nearly half are still not convinced that King's goal of true racial equality has been met.


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News