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Award-Winning Black Journalist Reaches Out To Black Community

 WASHINGTON, DC— Award-winning broadcast journalist Bruce Johnson wants to get the word out to African Americans about the benefits of a  heart healthy lifestyle and the road to recovery after a heart attack. Nearly  two decades after his own heart attack at the age of 42, Johnson has written Heart to  Heart(200 pp, published by iUniverse,  a  book that details the dramatic stories of twelve heart attack survivors,  including Johnson and three other African Americans: Barbara  Robinson, Reverend  James Love, and Larry Harris. 

  
" Heart to  Heart is about the power of one heart attack survivor sharing his or her  story with another survivor," says Johnson. Survivors talk candidly about life's  stresses, including socio-economic pressures, such as unemployment and divorce.  Much has been written about the medical side of cardiovascular disease. Heart  to Heart is the first book written about the human and emotional  side. 
  
Johnson, a native of Louisville, KY, mined his family’s  secrets and took an inventory of his own life, which included some reckless  behavior that may have contributed to his heart attack. His cardiovascular event  occurred while on a street assignment for WUSA-TV, the CBS affiliate in  Washington, DC. The actions of Johnson’s photographer got him to a hospital in  time for a team of medical professionals to perform an emergency angioplasty  that saved his life. 
 
As part of his transformation, the author modified his  soul food diet and learned to exercise intelligently. He became a runner and, at  the age of 50, eventually completed the 26.2 mile-long Marine Corps Marathon  ahead of half of the men in his age category. 
  
According to the American  Heart Association: Research studies reveal that cardiovascular disease is the leading  cause of death for African American males and females age 20 and older.  Statistics show that African Americans have a higher risk for cardiovascular  disease than Caucasians. Unfortunately, many African Americans don’t  know the risks for heart disease and stroke. Those who do know or experience  actual warning signs often wait until it is too late to seek emergency  care. 
 
“The good news is that while Heart to Heart reads like a novel, it contains a wealth of information and firsthand  accounts of how African Americans can reverse heart disease or avoid,  reduce or eliminate whatever risks they have for heart attacks and  cardiovascular events,” says Johnson. 
 
The author  encourages everyone to visit his Heart to  Heart  Web site,  www.brucejohnsonhearttoheart.com,  for more information and resources  about heart healthy lifestyles, cardiovascular disease, and heart attacks, and  to join him in an ongoing conversation about these and related topics on  Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/2fl2hhq  and Twitter at www.twitter.com/cbrucejohnson. 
  

 
About the Author 
As a reporter and anchor for CBS affiliate  WUSA-TV in Washington, DC, for more than 30 years, Johnson has earned a  reputation as an urban affairs and investigative journalist. He has been  dispatched on special assignment to many world capitals, including Moscow,  Port-au-Prince, Bangkok, Dakar, Paris, Tokyo, Budapest and Stockholm. He has won  19 Emmys and hundreds of civic honors. In 2003, he was inducted into the Society  of Professional Journalists Hall of Fame. 
 
Heart to Heart received the  Publisher’s Rising Star Award. 
  
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