November 27, 2020         
Outstanding Korean Products Introduced at TradeKorea Webpage - Beauty & Fashion   •   Papuan Pastor Questions BBC Reports on Indonesian Palm Oil Company Korindo   •   Enough is Enough: Ontario Engineering Community Committed to Uprooting Systematic Biases   •   Majority of Americans Expect to Buy Gifts This Holiday Season Despite Tumultuous Year, but Many Cut From the Gift List According   •   CTA Releases "What We Heard" report on Phase II of its Accessible Transportation for Persons with Disabilities Regulations   •   Narconon Latin America Helps Community Stay Safe During Coronavirus Pandemic   •   SONTIAN's Exhibition at Automechanika Shanghai 2020 is Packed With 100+ Free Samples and Live Streaming Available to All Automot   •   MANSCAPED™ Named Official Sponsor of Bad Boy Mowers Crossover Classic   •   Outstanding Korean Products Introduced on TradeKorea Webpage - Food & Beverage   •   “KISS THE GROUND” Wins Its 25th Film Festival Award to Date   •   Hall of Fame Resort & Entertainment Company Reveals Details of Hall Of Trivia on HQ App   •   Minister of Justice hosts virtual forum on Diversity on the Bench   •   Indigenous Land-Based STEM Education - The Classroom of the Future   •   iHeartMedia and Podimo Partner to Translate and Adapt Widely Popular Podcasts For Listeners Globally   •   Wondershare FamiSafe: The Most Reliable Parental Control App   •   Because Apes Are Hairy Too, MANSCAPED™ Supports the San Diego Zoo!   •   Comcast RISE Awards Over 700 Black-Owned, Small Businesses with Marketing and Technology Resources and Makeovers   •   Michaels is Calling On #DifferenceMakers to Creatively Spread Holiday Cheer   •   Vehicle Retail Sales Decline due to Quirky Sales Calendar; When Adjusted for Selling Days, Retail Sales Stable   •   F-LANE: Accelerating Female Empowerment globally in times of COVID-19
Bookmark and Share

Banned Books In The Texas Prison System

 

 AUSTIN, TX — What do Jon Stewart, William Shakespeare, Sojouner Truth, Juan Williams, Jenna Bush, 50 Cent, John Grisham, Noam Chomsky, Stephen King, John Updike, Kurt Vonnegut, Jack Kerouac, Gore Vidal, George Orwell, Gustave Flaubert, George Carlin, and Sister Helen Prejean have in common?

They have each written at least one book banned in Texas prisons.

READ FULL REPORT HERE

VIEW FULL LIST OF BANNED BOOKS

The Texas Civil Rights Project has announced the release of its eleventh Human Rights Report, “Banned Books in the Texas Prison System: How the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Censors Books Sent to Prisoners.”  For the first time, the report reveals the complete list of banned (and allowed) books in the Texas prison system.

“TDCJ’s book censorship is, frankly, bizarre,” said Scott Medlock, Director of the Texas Civil Rights Project’s Prisoners’ Rights Program.  “Certainly there are some books prisons could legitimately censor.  TDCJ, however, allows prisoners to read some of those titles, while banning numerous important works of literature, history and politics.”

The banned books list includes Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners, New York Times bestsellers, and books by Nobel Peace Prize nominees, National Public Radio correspondents, Ivy League professors, civil rights leaders, and even the Bard himself, William Shakespeare.  Conversely, the report sites two clear of examples of allowed books that could be banned: Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf (along with several other White Supremacist books), and Che Guevara’s Guerilla Warfare (which includes instructions on how to build a mortar).

“Literacy is probably the most important skill a prisoner can have when they are released from custody,” explained Medlock.  “Reading keeps prisoners occupied while they’re incarcerated, and helps them develop the skills they need to eventually become productive members of society.  Arbitrarily banning books fights against these goals.”

“It’s especially outrageous TDCJ censors dozens of books about prison conditions,” said Medlock.  The banned books list includes Prof. Robert Perkinson’s Texas Tough, a critically acclaimed history of TDCJ itself.

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) arbitrarily censors books and magazines sent to Texas prisoners. Though cultivating literacy has obvious rehabilitative benefits, TDCJ prevents prisoners from reading many books, including works by award-winning authors, literary classics, and books about civil rights and prison conditions. In violation of prisoners’ First Amendment rights, TDCJ prohibits the simple pleasure of reading important books.



 


STORY TAGS: Banned books , Texas prison system , Texas Civil Rights Project , Human Rights Report

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News