July 2, 2020         
Faisal Hossain Named First Medidata Founders’ Scholarship Award Winner   •   Abuse Survivors Take Action to Hold Kurn Hattin Homes for Children Accountable for Decades of Abuse, Reports ACFW   •   FOX Entertainment’s AVOD Service Tubi Adds 30 Seasons of Cult Phenom The Joy of Painting Featuring Bob Ross   •   BOMBAY SAPPHIRE® Gin Collaborates With Hebru Brantley To Launch First-Ever Artist Designed Bottle   •   Tractor Supply Company Teams up With the American Kennel Club in Support of Dogs and Owners   •   Landmark War Heroes on Water Tournament Set to Expand in 2021   •   Watercrest Senior Living Group and Partners Celebrate the Groundbreaking of Watercrest Myrtle Beach Assisted Living and Memory C   •   Les Dames d'Escoffier International Establishes the LDEI Relief Fund   •   Walmart Launches Virtual Summer Camp and Drive-In Movie Theater to Help Families Make the Most of Summer   •   Scott’s Liquid Gold Announces New Credit Facility with UMB   •   Proposition 21! – California Rent Control Ballot Measure Now Heads to Voters in November as Campaign Rolls Out 200+ Endors   •   Comedy Central Doubles Down on Adult Animation With a Reimagined “Beavis and Butt-Head”   •   Rental Affordability Act Endorsed by Top Latino Leaders, Taps NorCal Campaign Regional Chair   •   Children's Hospital Colorado Releases Guidance to Help Schools, Including Those in Rural Communities, Safely Return to In-Person   •   CORRECTING and REPLACING WorldRemit Celebrates the Launch of Their Remittance Service in Somalia   •   FIBRA Prologis to Host Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call July 23   •   Minister Farrakhan to deliver major July 4 worldwide address   •   American Honda Sales Continue Recovery, Despite Inventory Issues and COVID-19 Business Challenges   •   Law Professor Jody Armour's "N*gga Theory" Puts Racialized Mass Incarceration and the Black Lives Matter Movement into Context f   •   Christine Michel Carter Co-Hosts Event Discussing How COVID-19 And Black Lives Matter Disproportionately Affect Black Moms
Bookmark and Share

Black Heart Attack Victims Wait Longer For Specialized Care

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Black patients having a heart attack wait longer at hospitals than white patients to get advanced procedures that will restore blood flow to their hearts, according to a University of Michigan Health System study.

Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American NewsThe differences in care may be explained by hospital quality, rather than the race of individual patients.

Black patients were much more likely to go to slow hospitals than were whites, and as a result waited six hours longer to get life-saving procedures.

Most elderly black patients received care in a small number of hospitals that take longer to transfer their patients, regardless of race, according to the U-M study published in the July issue of Medical Care, the journal of the American Public Health Association.

“These data suggest that an individual’s race may play much less of a role in generating differences in care, while the hospitals where black patients often go may be even more important,” says study lead author Colin R. Cooke, M.D., a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan.

Each year tens of thousands of patients with heart attacks use hospitals that lack staff and capacity to perform angioplasty or open heart surgery – commonly called revascularization procedures that open clogged arteries and restore blood flow to the heart.

Experts recommend that heart attack patients, who come to the emergency room of these hospitals, be transferred quickly to one that can do revascularization.

Researchers analyzed nearly 26,000 Medicare patient records for the study that looked at how hospitals across the nation may influence racial differences in health care.

The U-M authors note that the causes for delays in hospitals that serve a greater number of black patients is not clear, but based on prior research speculate that quality of care at these hospitals may be worse.

Strapped by financial constraints, safety net hospitals may forego development of a ‘quality improvement culture’ or limit adoption of computer order entry or electronic medical records, infrastruture which may improve the quality of care.

The most important step in improving cardiovascular care for black patients is addressing organizational issues and resources at hospitals where black patients seek medical care, authors say.


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News