Today's Date: December 8, 2022
TRANSUNION ALERT: Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C. is Investigating TransUnion on Behalf of Long-Term Stockholders and Encourages   •   Walgreens Boots Alliance Sells Shares of AmerisourceBergen Corporation for $1.0 billion of Proceeds   •   AmerisourceBergen Announces Common Share Repurchase From Walgreens Boots Alliance   •   F45 ALERT: Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C. Announces that a Class Action Lawsuit Has Been Filed Against F45 Training Holdings, I   •   Connected California Program Launches to Bridge the Digital Divide   •   JIM HENSON'S FAMILY HUB ON YOUTUBE LAUNCHES FULL EPISODES OF BELOVED PUPPET SERIES "PAJANIMALS" TO HELP PRESCHOOLERS WITH CHANGI   •   Darling Ingredients Signs Commitment Letter to Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi), Continues Advancing 2050 Net-Zero Goal   •   The Urban League of Greater Atlanta Celebrates 100+ Years of Service to Metro Atlanta   •   Shareholder Notice: Robbins LLP Informs Investors of Class Action Against Iris Energy Limited (IREN)   •   TCU’s Tre’Vius Hodges-Tomlinson Named 2022 Paycom Jim Thorpe Award Winner   •   The Law Offices of Frank R. Cruz Announces Investigation of Rite Aid Corporation (RAD) on Behalf of Investors   •   Stacey Babson Kaplan Named Senior Vice President, Chief Sustainability and Compliance Officer   •   INVESTOR ALERT: F45 Training Holdings, Inc. Investors with Substantial Losses Have Opportunity to Lead the F45 Training Class Ac   •   NEOGENOMICS SHAREHOLDER ALERT by Former Louisiana Attorney General: Kahn Swick & Foti, LLC Reminds Investors With Losses in   •   Family Research Council's Tony Perkins' Statement on the Final Passage of 'Respect for Marriage' Act   •   Alameda Health System's and Alameda County Public Health Department's BElovedBIRTH Black Centering Receives The 2022 Quality Lea   •   Brookdale Reports November 2022 Occupancy   •   PG&E Prepared to Respond to Significant Storm System Expected to Impact Northern and Central California this Weekend   •   Hennessy Advisors, Inc. Announces Changes to the Board of Directors   •   Hearts for Hospice and Catholic Hospice bring back The Best of the Best of Las Olas Luncheon
Bookmark and Share

Black Leaders React To Census Criticism

 

Contributed by PEDRO CORTES and STEPHANIE LONDONO

Florida International University

Local black leaders and organizations reject accusations by the Urban

League of Greater Miami that they failed to promote the 2010 U.S.

Census to Liberty City residents and to the black community generally.

“I am so tired of our leadership dropping the ball on opportunities to empower our people,” Urban League president T.
Willard Fair wrote in a scathing post earlier this month on the League's “We Count Too, Miami,”(wecounttoomiami.com)
website, part of an Urban League/Census partnership aimed at increasing black community participation.

Fair chastised leaders whom he said did not show up at Census planning meetings held by the city and failed to create
the community-wide effort envisioned by Census organizers.

But some leaders didn't think promoting the once-a-decade national population count was their job.
“We thought it was more to do with the Urban League and the NAACP,” said Marc Henderson, historian and
parliamentarian of 100 Black Men of South Florida, a mentoring and networking group primarily focused on youth.
The U.S. Constitution requires a census to determine the number of congressional seats allocated to each state.
Perhaps more important, though, is that Census numbers determine where to spend more than 400 billion federal dollars
on schools, hospitals, roads and other services.

Liberty City's response rate in the 2000 Census was roughly 57 percent, about the same as this year and lagging only
slightly behind Miami as a whole.

The Urban League has been the most visible community group working on the Census and Fair said black elected
officials, organizations and churches failed to support attempts to obtain additional money for outreach programs.
“We have not been able to galvanize. This is disappointing to me,” Fair said in an interview after his article appeared on
the We Count Too, Miami site.

Census officials agree with at least part of Fair's critique.
“It was not the Census that didn't show up, it was the black leaders who didn't do anything,” said Rafael de la Portilla,
senior partnership specialist with the 2010 effort.

Other community leaders said they did what they could.

The African Heritage Cultural Arts Center provided space for training Census workers, said center director Marshall
Davis, and promoted Census employment opportunities.

While agreeing that participation in the Census should be a community-wide goal, Davis said organizations like his
cannot be held accountable and that people have to seek their own connections.

The city-sponsored Liberty City Trust held information sessions and forwarded emails about the Census for the people in
its boundaries.

“The community needs to be educated about the census,” said Brandyss Y. Howard, the trust's spokeswoman.
Howard also echoed Fair's frustration.

“If we had strong high level officials then maybe it would have been different,” she said.

PCort001@Fiu.edu
 
 


Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News