Today's Date: September 27, 2021
Cannabis use by pregnant women increased during pandemic   •   Young Children Gained Weight During The Pandemic   •   Transact Wins Stevie Awards for Women in Business   •   Introducing the GUESS Originals x Anna Nicole Smith Collection by Cali Thornhill Dewitt for Fall 2021   •   Women First Digital’s HowToUseAbortionPill.org Teams Up with Doctors Without Borders to Launch Groundbreaking Video Series   •   Anti-Trafficking International Hosts First "Be the Light" Gala, Friday, October 15, 2021   •   Boys & Girls Clubs of America Introduces Kids and Teens to Careers in Veterinary Medicine   •   Empire BlueCross and its Associates Give Back to the Capital Region with Several Volunteer Days Events and a Grant Focused on Ta   •   OATS from AARP and the News Literacy Project Announce Virtual Workshops for Seniors to Combat Misinformation   •   Girls in Tech Launches Next Generation of Public Sector and Service Leaders to Employ and Elevate Women in the Public Sector Wor   •   Party City Debuts Boo-Loon Land Immersive Pop-Up Balloon Experience in New York City   •   HARMAN Partners with REACH to Expand Remote Care Platform for Maternal Health and Wellness   •   Empire BlueCross BlueShield and its Foundation Mobilize to Tackle Food Insecurity for Hunger Action Month During the Company&rsq   •   Novel Research Tackling Challenges in Women's Health Announced at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting   •   Rent-A-Center Reopens Store in Lawton, Oklahoma   •   Susan G. Komen® Recognizes Renowned Investigators as 2021 Recipients of Brinker Awards for Scientific Distinction   •   Energy, Focus, Intention: New CBD Strength Gummy from House of Wise Empowers Women to Reclaim Their Workout Routines, Make the M   •   Calling All Creatives: JOANN Stores Hiring Thousands Across the Country   •   Osibanjo, Okonkwo, others for Yoda Paga   •   Live Online Event to Launch World’s First Video-Based Devotional App
Bookmark and Share

Black Photographer To Be Honored By Intl Civil Rights Museum


 

GREENSBORO, N.C., — Matthew Lewis has captured some of the nation’s most historic events and people behind the lens of a camera during his storied 25-year career at The Washington Post. On June 26, at 3 p.m. the International Civil Rights Center & Museum will honor the Pulitzer-Prize winning photographer during a special tribute and public reception. Lewis’ works — the people, places and iconic moments of the Civil Rights Movement — are currently on view in the Museum’s Changing Gallery as part of its inaugural exhibit.

 

“Matthew Lewis is a civil rights pioneer and people have a chance to witness, through the lens of his camera, some of the most extraordinary moments in civil rights history,” said Bamidele Demerson, executive director and curator for the International Civil Rights Center & Museum. “Lewis stood on the streets as D.C. exploded in flames during the civil unrest of the 1960s, covered the March on Washington, the Poor People’s March and countless other landmark events. His photography tells an emotional and evocative story.”

 

Lewis was The Washington Post’s first African-American photographer and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1975. His iconic work also appears in the Museum’s permanent exhibition, “The Battlegrounds.” The Church and the Movement gallery features a stirring image of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., standing boldly behind a church pulpit. Lewis snapped the image a mere six weeks before Dr. King’s assassination in Memphis, Tenn. 

 

“That image captures on film my personal feelings of Martin Luther King,” said Lewis. “And that’s my favorite. It will always be my favorite out of the thousands I’ve taken.”

 

Lewis lives in Thomasville, N.C., and retired from The Washington Post in 1990. He is a graduate of Morgan State College, now known as Morgan State University in Baltimore, Md., and freelanced for the Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper and worked as a staff photographer for the Thomasville Times.

 

“You feel fortunate to have some important photographs not just of great people, but of the average person – the poor person,” said Lewis. “That’s what excites me more than anything.

 

The special tribute to Matthew Lewis is open to the public. Admission is $6 for adults, seniors and students. Children are $4. For more information, visit www.sitinmovement.org or contact the Museum at (336) 274-9199.

 

The Museum offers daily, self-guided tours through The Changing Gallery exhibition: The Civil Rights Movement Through the Lens of Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographer Matthew Lewis. General admission fees apply.

 

###

 

 

RoKeya Worthy, Assistant Account Executive

Office: 336.553.1708

Fax: 336.553.1735

rworthy@rlfcommunications.com

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News