Today's Date: June 8, 2023
Federman & Sherwood Investigates Over the Top Marketing (OTTM) for Data Breach   •   Federman & Sherwood Investigates Summit Eye & Optical for Data Breach   •   New Canyonville Solar Project to Benefit Oregon Residents and Agriculture   •   Brookdale Reports May 2023 Occupancy   •   U.S. Conference of Mayors Denounces State Legislature Attacks on LGBTQ+ Rights, Reaffirms Commitment to LGBTQ+ Community   •   Federman & Sherwood Investigates New Enchantment Group, LLC for Data Breach   •   Biote Announces Expiration and Results of Exchange Offer and Consent Solicitation Relating to Warrants   •   Federman & Sherwood Investigates GCM, Inc for Data Breach   •   Waystar Accelerates Impact in Healthcare Payments with New Innovations on Cloud-Based Platform   •   University of Phoenix and Military Police Regimental Association Announce Winner of Full-Tuition Scholarship   •   USCIB Releases Pride Month Statement, Supporting Equality and Inclusion   •   NAELA Theresa Award Honors Attorney Laurie Hanson, a Trusted Advocate for Individuals Living With Disabilities   •   A Decade of Impact: 11,000 Our Military Kids Scholarships Funded by KBP Brands   •   Forbes names Sun Life U.S. a Best Employer for Diversity   •   GenCare Lifestyle and Rippl Care Announce Partnership to Bring Enhanced Behavioral Health Care to Senior Living Communities   •   INVESTOR ALERT: Law Offices of Howard G. Smith Announces the Filing of a Securities Class Action on Behalf of Tingo Group, Inc.   •   TIO CLASS ACTION NOTICE: Glancy Prongay & Murray LLP Files Securities Fraud Lawsuit Against Tingo Group, Inc.   •   KIA K5 NAMED AMONG LIST OF 2023 BEST CARS FOR TEENS BY U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT   •   Pennsylvania American Water Signs Agreement to Purchase Farmington Township’s Water and Wastewater Systems   •   SoftwareReviews Reveals the Top ESG Software Solutions That Enable Organizations to Build a Culture of Purpose and Sustainabilit
Bookmark and Share

Black Professor: Tweaking Twain's "Huck Finn" OK

ST. LOUIS, MO - Changing words in Mark Twain’s classic book Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is fine as long as the original version still is easily available for readers, says Gerald L. Early, PhD, the Merle Kling Professor of Modern Letters in Arts & Sciences and director of the Center for the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis.

BLACK NEWS, AFRICAN AMERICAN NEWS, MINORITY NEWS, CIVIL RIGHTS NEWS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY, AFRO AMERICAN NEWSA new edition of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, scheduled to be published in February by NewSouth Books, substitutes the word “slave” for the “n-word” and “Indian” for “injun” throughout the book.

The publisher has been accused of censorship and altering a classic of American literature for the sake of political correctness. Early argues that this is just another case of tinkering with texts in order to create a version that best serves its audience.

“We change texts all the time,” Early says. “For instance, we make children’s versions of the Bible, Homer and Shakespeare.

“We have abridged versions of many books for all sorts of reasons. Joel Chandler Harris’ Uncle Remus tales have been revised, rewritten, the dialect changed for modern readers.”

Early says that removing the “n-word” from Huckleberry Finn is just that kind of abridgement.

“People do not have to accept it, and they can show their displeasure by simply not buying and reading this abridgment,” he says.

“Many times abridgments are made that are unwise or unwarranted or unjustified. Sometimes not. Let the public decide in this instance, as it does in all others.”

Early, a professor of English, of African and African-American studies, and of American culture studies, is a noted essayist and American culture critic.

He is the author of several books, including The Culture of Bruising: Essays on Prizefighting, Literature and Modern American Culture, which won the 1994 National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism, and This Is Where I Came In: Black America in the 1960s. Other works are One Nation Under a Groove: Motown and American Culture; Daughters: On Family and Fatherhood; and Tuxedo Junction: Essays on American Culture.

Early also is editor of numerous volumes, including The Muhammad Ali Reader and The Sammy Davis, Jr. Reader. He served as a consultant on four of Ken Burns’ documentary films: Baseball, Jazz, Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson and The War, and appeared in the first three as an on-air analyst.  


STORY TAGS: BLACK NEWS, AFRICAN AMERICAN NEWS, MINORITY NEWS, CIVIL RIGHTS NEWS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY, AFRO AMERICAN NEWS

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News