July 7, 2020         
Enter the Virtual Buffalo 60 Strong Calendar Contest: Celebrate Life After 60!   •   Recognize Your SuperWomen by Nominating Them for the 3rd Annual SuperWomen in Flash Leadership Award   •   National Museum of African American Music Adds New Vice President   •   Shortcut Rises to Meet Unprecedented Demand for In-Home Haircuts as COVID-19 Pandemic Continues   •   ThayerMahan Senior Staff Engineer Returns from East Africa Deployment   •   Overcoming Covid-19 Challenges: Alexander James Rodriguez Releases 'My Crew'   •   Pinnacle Treatment Centers Opens Addiction Treatment Program in Roanoke   •   The Canadian Council of Business Leaders Against Anti-Black Systemic Racism and the Canadian Black Chamber of Commerce Form Stra   •   ViiV Healthcare Announces Superior Efficacy of Investigational, Long-Acting Injectable Formulation of Cabotegravir Dosed Every T   •   eSight Eyewear to Participate in 2020 Disability:IN Conference   •   ASCAP Latin Music Awards Premiere Today Across All Social Media Platforms: Latin Music Superstars, Prominent Producers And The G   •   New UBS report reveals that joint financial participation is the key to gender equality   •   Los Angeles County Department Of Public Health Launches "Angelenos In Action": An Invitation For The Public To Join In The COVID   •    Acessa Health Announces Positive Payer Coverage, with Over Half of Insured Americans Covered for the Procedure   •   Generation Influence: Gen Z Study Reveals a New Digital Paradigm   •   Cedar Fair Announces Extension of Exchange Offer   •   Tampa Meal Prep Company Expands Meal Delivery Service Nationwide   •   Two New Publications Support the Safety and Efficacy of Slynd™ (drospirenone) tablets, 4 mg   •   Kiva Receives USAID Design Funding to Structure Innovative $100M Fund to Support 1 Million Women Globally   •   Zigazoo kicks off Farm Month with readings from Laura Numeroff and other award-winning children's authors
Bookmark and Share

Blacks' Migration To Have Big Impact On Redistricting

 WASHINGTON - As lawmakers across the nation begin the once-a-decade process of redrawing their congressional boundaries, a significant migration of blacks from cities to suburbs is having a widespread political impact, the Washington Post reports.

According to newly released census numbers, eight of the nation’s top majority-black districts lost an average of more than 10 percent of their African American populations. That will provide an opportunity for Republican lawmakers, who control an increasing number of statehouses following last fall’s elections, to reshape districts in suburban swing areas of Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Georgia and elsewhere.

Dozens of seats could become easier for Republicans to hold on to, with a half-dozen or so becoming prime pickup opportunities for the party, according to political strategists.

“The practical effect is great for the GOP,” said Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report. “In state after state, it’s allowing Republicans to pack more heavily Democratic close-in suburbs into urban black districts to make surrounding districts more Republican.”

The migration of blacks to the suburbs is also having an impact in the Washington area, where the African American population in the District dropped 11 percent over the last decade, while suburban Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.) gained more black voters than anyone outside of the fast-growing Atlanta area.

Fellow Maryland Democrats Donna F. Edwards and Chris Van Hollen also gained large numbers of black voters. Unlike some other places, though, those lawmakers are not likely to be greatly affected, since Democrats control the redistricting process in Maryland.

The 1982 amendment of the Voting Rights Act led to the creation of many legislative districts, particularly in the South, in which minorities became the majority populations. The idea was to give minority voters a chance to elect candidates of their choice. Over time, these districts encountered legal challenges and setbacks, including at the Supreme Court, over questions of racial gerrymandering.

Initially, these districts were a boon to Democrats, creating opportunities in places where the party struggled to win. But over the last few rounds of redistricting, Republicans have made a habit of “packing” as many reliably Democratic black voters into as few districts as possible, virtually guaranteeing black representation for those districts while also making nearby ones more winnable for the GOP.

So even as the African American population has been shrinking in many longtime black districts, the number of majority-black districts has actually increased over the last decade — and could very well continue to do so, with Republicans leading the redistricting process this year.


STORY TAGS: redistricting , migration , suburbs , Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News