Today's Date: May 25, 2024
Hyundai Extends Partnership of National Salute to America's Heroes Through 2027   •   Red Lake Nation College Opens First-Ever Tribal College in U.S. City   •   Danimer Scientific Receives Continued Listing Standard Notice from NYSE   •   Summit Medical Staffing Honored Among Veteran 100 Fastest-Growing Veteran-Owned or Operated Businesses in America   •   Feinstein Academy of Scholars Symposium and Elmezzi Graduate School Commencement draws top scientific minds: Peter J. Hotez, Rob   •   Li-Cycle Provides Update on Annual General and Special Meeting Results   •   The Dolly Parton Experience Now Open at Dollywood   •   The Drew Barrymore Show Spotlights Social Changemakers; Elevate Prize Foundation Rallies Nominations for the Elevate Prize GET L   •   Greenberg Traurig's Renée Mosley Delcollo Selected to Receive the 'She's on Her Way' Award   •   Brown Books Publishing Group Publishes Road-Trip Novel Perfect for Summer Reading   •   Amerant Bank Donates 250 Tickets to Local Veterans and First Responders for Game 4 of Florida Panthers Playoffs   •   Fonon at Cutting Edge of Additive Manufacturing in Mining   •   Q2 and Austin FC Announce the 2024 Dream Starter Competition Winner - 29ELEVEN THE SALON   •   Honoring Our Veterans: Carl's Jr. and Hardee's Kick Off 13th Annual Stars for Heroes Campaign   •   Ensuring accessible and affordable quality medicines for Canadians   •   We Must Respond to the Call by the African Union: Educate an Africa Fit for the 21st Century   •   Colibri Real Estate Elevates Learning Experiences for Real Estate Students With New Accessible Narrated Audio with Adjustable Sp   •   Rotary Club of Southern Frederick County (Urbana) Donates $2,500 and Volunteer Hours to Sleep in Heavenly Peace   •   CIB invests $337 million towards hydrogen production and refuelling network in Western Canada   •   Comvest Partners Announces Investment In Senior Helpers
Bookmark and Share

CA Moms Support Legal Pot

By Joseph McNamara and Stephen Downing, USA Today


WEST HOLLYWOOD - Proposition 19 presents California voters with a simple choice: Continue a policy that has failed completely, causes massive harm and can never work — or say yes to a common-sense approach that destroys a $14 billion black market run by violent thugs and replaces it with a legal, controlled market, all while eliminating enforcement costs and bringing in new tax revenue.

As former big-city police officials, we're saying yes to the rational approach that regulates marijuana like alcohol and cigarettes.

After decades of marijuana prohibition, with millions of arrests and billions of dollars spent, the results are in. Prohibition is a disaster.

Anyone in California who wants marijuana can get marijuana. Massive law enforcement efforts have only made cartels rich, and black market violence hurts innocent people and their children caught in the crossfire between criminals. Teenagers get marijuana more easily than beer, because drug dealers don't ask for proof of age.

Because marijuana (other than legal medical marijuana) is illegal, it can't be taxed. Neighborhoods want police to fulfill their primary duty of protecting life and property, but officers are distracted by futile marijuana enforcement. Opponents of Prop 19, however, ask people to vote for more of what has not worked in the past and cannot work in the future.

Opponents of Prop 19 can't deny that marijuana prohibition is a disaster, so they try to discredit legalization by claiming that it would allow people to drive under the influence, that it is invalid since federal law will still be in force, and that it would increase use.

In our view, these are all untrue. For example, the U.S. already has the highest rate of marijuana use in the world, despite having some of the harshest penalties. Our rate is twice that of The Netherlands, where retail marijuana sales have been allowed for decades.

Opponents by now should realize that voters won't buy their fear-based claims much longer. The polls show Prop 19 ahead, with a real shot at passing. A broad coalition endorses Prop 19, including the state's largest labor union, the state NAACP, Latino leaders and Law Enforcement Against Prohibition — a 35,000-member group made up of police, prosecutors, judges, prison officials and others.

The latter are the people asked to enforce prohibition. They're saying it won't work, and so will (we hope) a majority of California's voters.
Joseph McNamara is a former San Jose chief of police; Stephen Downing is a former Los Angeles deputy chief of police.

 


STORY TAGS: WOMEN , MINORITY , DISCRIMINATION , DIVERSITY , FEMALE , UNDERREPRESENTED , EQUALITY , GENDER BIAS , EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
Breaking News
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News