September 28, 2020         
Statement by Minister Chagger on Yom Kippur   •   Frog Street Offers Extensive "At-Home Learning" Resources to Help Children Stay Engaged in New Hybrid Learning Environments   •   The Executive Women's Forum announces the 2020 Finalists for the Women of Influence Awards & Corporate Award   •   Cubic Introduces New Ventra Mobile App for Chicagoland Travelers   •   AHF Rings Alarm Over Nationwide Shortage of STD Test Kits   •   ADEA Statement in Support of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Workplace Training   •   HyperX Releases QuadCast S USB Microphone With Dynamic RGB Lighting Effects That Can Be Personalized With Custom Settings   •   Books-A-Million Honors U.S. Military with Coffee for the Troops Program Through October 24   •   Prospera Celebrates Local Hispanic-Owned, Small Businesses   •   Author Ted Rupnik's new book "Three Willie" is a charming children's story with an important lesson about accountability and com   •   In response to Governor Newsom signing Assembly Bill 2149 into law Postmates along with other concerned parties, Dine Black LA a   •   Statement by the Prime Minister on Yom Kippur   •   TherapeuticsMD Provides Update on Third Quarter Progress   •   Post Office & Experts' name-by-name review finds "Movers' list of Voters Facing Purge 'Wrong and racist'"   •   The Return of the Pope of Buddhism Scepter by His Holiness Dorje Chang Buddha III was Rejected   •   Laird Superfood Announces Closing of Initial Public Offering and Exercise in Full of the Underwriters’ Option to Purchase   •   Mark Your Calendars! Prime Day Is Here in Time for the Holidays on October 13 & 14   •   Association of Independent Mortgage Experts Partners with United Wholesale Mortgage and Home Point Financial to Introduce Small   •   ERLC President Russell Moore Affirms Amy Coney Barrett as SCOTUS Justice Nominee   •   LegalShield Leadership Convention, Lead the Change, to Bring Record Number of Associates Together Virtually
Bookmark and Share

Cemetery Discover Concerns Native Americans

LOS ANGELES - The construction of a Mexican cultural center in Los Angeles has uncovered a 200-year-old Catholic cemetery mistakenly thought to have been moved. The development has caused concern among Native Americans and others who believe their relatives are among the buried.

La Plaza de Cultura y Artes is a project of Los Angeles County and a Smithsonian affiliate. Its construction work is taking place near Our Lady of the Angels Catholic church, the city’s oldest parish also known as La Placita.

Historical records indicate that anywhere from 100 to 300 American Indians are likely to be buried at the center’s site, the San Gabriel Valley Tribune reports.

The construction on the center halted as soon as the cemetery was discovered, though it is still scheduled to open soon.

Archdiocesan officials said their records erroneously showed the cemetery was closed in 1844 and the graves were relocated.

Officials also said the builders should have notified them that full grave sites were found. They reported that their initial impression was that only a few bone fragments had been uncovered.

CNA contacted the archdiocese for further comment but officials were unable to respond to inquiries.

The cemetery was the final resting place of early residents of Los Angeles, who include Native Americans and Spanish, Mexican and European colonists, along with their intermarried children, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Some archaeologists say they have found records concerning who was buried in the original cemetery. Residents who claim ancestors in the first cemetery have gathered at the site on occasion to pay respect to the dead.

“We want the Native American history to be told also, besides just the Mexican American,” Tim Poyorena-Miguel, archivist for the Montebello Historical Society and a Gabrielino Indian, told the Tribune. "The Native Americans were there first and they're digging up their bones."

He said Gabrielinos have asked La Plaza officials to return the bones to the site and be reburied.

"We're just trying to understand all the interested parties' concerns and that will help figure into how we use the land moving forward," La Plaza spokeswoman Katie Dunham said. "We gave them a chance to air their concerns. We left it as an open forum for them to say what they think."

Construction of the cultural center is currently on hold, following the discovery.


STORY TAGS: NATIVE AMERICAN NEWS, INDIAN NEWS, NATIVE NEWS, MINORITY NEWS, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, DIVERSITY, RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News