Today's Date: May 11, 2021
DCF Secretary Shevaun Harris Announces Launch of “OUR Florida” to Provide Rental Assistance to Floridians and Busine   •   Parentis Foundation Emerges from the Pandemic with Stories of Success   •   CRN Foundation Announces Launch of Vitamin D & Me!™ Consumer Education Website on Vitamin D and COVID-19   •   University Of North Texas System Partners With The Dallas Morning News To Launch New Podcast   •   Even when they include them, gifted programs aren't serving Black and low-income kids   •   Johns Hopkins University And Bloomberg Philanthropies Announce The Vivien Thomas Scholars Initiative, A $150 Million Effort To F   •   Meenta Announces Partnership with Mirimus for K-12 Pooled Saliva COVID-19 Testing   •   Black Voices for Black Justice Fund Announces Third Round of Awards to Expand the Impact of Black Activists Advancing Racial Jus   •   The Future Is HBCU At OZY Fest   •   Cordoba Corporation Welcomes Emilio Cruz as Senior Vice President   •   InterPrice Technologies, Inc. Certified as a Woman-Owned Business   •   Statement - A plan to ensure greater funding for First Nations children, families and communities   •   Tina Gravel, Jean O’Neill, and Tamara Prazak Named to CRN’s 2021 Women of the Channel List   •   Skechers Announces Participation at the Morgan Stanley Life After Covid: 2021 Thematic Conference   •   SITE Centers Announces 9% Increase in Common Stock Dividend   •   Future plc Acquires Marie Claire US   •   Government of Canada to provide support to communities in Nunavut to address the COVID-19 pandemic   •   Sun West’s Diana Montoya-Cortes Becomes One of the First Puerto Ricans to Make Scotsman Guide’s ‘Top Originato   •   AshBritt Works with Autism Speaks, Best Buddies to Create Positive Vaccine Experiences for Individuals with Disabilities   •   PIH Health Achieves Healthgrades 2021 Patient Safety Excellence Award™
Bookmark and Share

Census Bureau Reports Promising Numbers Of Women Advanced Degree Holders

 

      The U.S. Census Bureau reported more women than men are expected to occupy professions such as doctors, lawyers and college professors as they represent approximately 58 percent of young adults, age 25 to 29, who hold an advanced degree. In addition, among all adults 25 and older, more women than men had high school diplomas and bachelor’s degrees.

     The tabulations, Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009, showed that among people in the 25-29 age group, 9 percent of women and 6 percent of men held either a master’s, professional (such as law or medical) or doctoral degree. This holds true for white, black and Hispanic women. Among Asian men and women of this age group, there was no statistical difference.

    The data also demonstrate the extent to which having such a degree pays off: average earnings in 2008 totaled $83,144 for those with an advanced degree, compared with $58,613 for those with a bachelor’s degree only. People whose highest level of attainment was a high school diploma had average earnings of $31,283.

     Also included are data on the highest level of education achieved by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, including age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, household relationship, citizenship, nativity and year of entry. Historical tables provide data on mean earnings by attainment level, sex, race and Hispanic origin with data back to 1975, and tables on attainment levels back to 1940.

     Sonia Collazo, a Census Bureau demographer, notes, “The attainment tabulations are the most detailed education-level data available from the Census Bureau. The data allow analysts to precisely track the education levels of the population, from the least to the most educated. In all, 15 levels are shown for detailed age groups by race and Hispanic origin.” (See <http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/education/cps2009.html>, Detailed Table 1.)

     Other highlights:

  • Overall, 87 percent of adults 25 and older had a high school diploma or more in 2009, with 30 percent holding at least a bachelor’s degree.
  • Among women 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or more, 65 percent were married with a spouse present. The corresponding rate for men was 71 percent. For women and men with advanced degrees, the corresponding percentages were 66 percent and 76 percent.
  • The number of U.S. residents with bachelor’s degrees or more climbed 34 percent between 1999 and 2009, from 43.8 million to 58.6 million.
  • More than half (53 percent) of Asians 25 and older had a bachelor’s degree or more, much higher than the rate for non-Hispanic whites (33 percent), blacks (19 percent) and Hispanics (13 percent).
  • Among young adults 25 to 29, 35 percent of women and 27 percent of men possessed a bachelor’s degree or more in 2009. This gap has grown considerably in the last decade: it was only 3 percentage points in 1999 (30 percent for women, 27 percent for men).

     These data come from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic supplement, which is conducted in February, March and April at about 100,000 addresses nationwide.


Percentage of Adults 25 and Older with Education
Beyond a Bachelor’s Degree
  Both Sexes Men Women
1960 3.0 4.4 1,7
1970 4.3 6.3 2.4
1980 7.2 9.8 5.0
1990 8.8 10.9 6.9
2000 8.6 10.0 7.3
2009 10.6 11.1 10.1

 


Percentage of Young (Age 25-29) Advanced Degree
Holders by Gender
  Total holders
(age 25-29)
Percent 
Men
Percent
Women
1960 416,000 78% 22%
1970 783,000 73% 27%
1980 1,474,000 58% 42%
1990 1,384,000 53% 47%
2000 994,000 42% 58%
2009 1,579,000 42% 58%

Note: Data from 1960 to 1980 pertain to those with five or more years of college. Data for 2000 and 2009 pertain to those with a master’s, professional or doctoral degree.

 

- X -

 

 

  • Robert Bernstein
  • Public Information Office
  • 301-763-3030/763-3762 (fax)
  • e-mail: <pio@census.gov>

 

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News