Today's Date: June 28, 2022
NCCI Golf Event Generates $25,000 for Kids' Chance of America Scholarships   •   Saving Lives One Mammogram at a Time, VNA Launches its ‘Worth the Squeeze’ Initiative   •   Checkmarx' Ana Lucia Amaral Honored as a CRN 2022 Woman of the Channel   •   O’Charley’s Announces ‘Drive For 5’ Promotion and NASCAR Sweepstakes with Coca-Cola Company   •   Luchadores and Superheroes Featured in Colorful COVID-19 Ad Campaigns   •   Tracey Hayes from MicroAge Named on CRN's 2022 Women of the Channel Power 70 Solution Providers List   •   JetBlue’s Soar with Reading Initiative Lands in Newark, NJ with Free Digital Book Vending Machines in Five Locations Thro   •   Five Bluum Standouts Honored on CRN 2022 Women of the Channel List   •   Natanael Cano Announces His Long Awaited US Tour "¿PERO SI CABEN O NO? TOUR"   •   Mrs. Flowers Takes the Helm at Comfort Home Care, Rockville, MD   •   Equitable Bank Releases Inaugural ESG Performance Report   •   HireAHelper Analysis Shows Summer 2022 is the Most Expensive Time to Move — Ever   •   Four recipients of the 2022 Awards of Excellence in Nursing announced from Indigenous Services Canada   •   Global Surrogacy Services Announces Outreach to Potential Gestational Surrogates in Three Southwestern States   •   Maximus Names Robert Knapp as Senior Vice President of Digital Government Solutions   •   Aviation Capital Group and the ISTAT Foundation Launch Diversity and Inclusion Fund   •   RNR Tire Express Surprises Tampa-Area Woman with New Car in Mother's Day Giveaway   •   Bob’s Discount Furniture’s Carol Glaser Receives Top Women in Retail Supply Chain Award   •   H-E-B Edges Out Amazon as the Top U.S. eCommerce Grocery Retailer, dunnhumby Retailer Preference Index Finds   •   Closing the Health Disparity Gap for Black Women
Bookmark and Share

Depression Plagues Black Fathers

ANN ARBOR, MI  -  A new University of Michigan study finds that black fathers are 50 percent more likely to be depressed than men in the general population. One quarter of black fathers were depressed at some time over the five-year course of the study.

 

Additionally, black fathers with lower levels of education and income have elevated rates of depression. Depression is twice as prevalent among those without a high school education.

 

These findings are surprising because depression is more often linked to women and mothers, rather than men and fathers.

 

"The results are also troubling, given current economic conditions," said Marilyn Sinkewicz, assistant professor at the U-M School of Social Work.

 

Black men are disproportionately exposed to adverse social and economic factors that are linked to depression. The study highlights the need for policies that target education, job training, child support and criminal justice issues among black fathers, as well as policies that also consider the mental health of these men.

 

Sinkewicz studies the health and mental health of men and boys, and the spillover effects on their families. She co-authored the study, which appears in the current issue of Research on Social Work Practice, with Rufina Lee of New York State Psychiatric Institute.

 

The researchers used data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, which followed 3,710 children born to unmarried parents and 1,188 children born to married parents. Parents were recruited from 75 hospitals in 20 major cities in the late 1990s.

 

Fathers and mothers were interviewed immediately after the birth of their child.  Follow-up interviews occurred when the child was 1, 3 and 5 years old.  The study is ongoing.

 

On the whole, conditions among black fathers worsened over the course of the study. The proportion that remained free of depression and the proportion that recovered from depression decreased at each follow up interview.

 

Seventy five percent of black fathers were free from depression, anxiety, substance dependence, and bad health. These problems were highly concentrated in fathers with depression. Co-occurring conditions such as these are more chronic and difficult to treat.

 

Fathers with depression and those with multiple health and mental health problems were also more likely to have looser bonds with the mothers of their children, even though these fathers start out with high hopes for family life. This study suggests that fulfilling these dreams requires a focus on the mental health of fathers.


STORY TAGS: BLACK, AFRICAN AMERICAN, MINORITY, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, , RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News