Today's Date: June 29, 2022
Aviation Capital Group and the ISTAT Foundation Launch Diversity and Inclusion Fund   •   Natanael Cano Announces His Long Awaited US Tour "¿PERO SI CABEN O NO? TOUR"   •   HireAHelper Analysis Shows Summer 2022 is the Most Expensive Time to Move — Ever   •   JetBlue’s Soar with Reading Initiative Lands in Newark, NJ with Free Digital Book Vending Machines in Five Locations Thro   •   Mrs. Flowers Takes the Helm at Comfort Home Care, Rockville, MD   •   NCCI Golf Event Generates $25,000 for Kids' Chance of America Scholarships   •   Tracey Hayes from MicroAge Named on CRN's 2022 Women of the Channel Power 70 Solution Providers List   •   Closing the Health Disparity Gap for Black Women   •   Bob’s Discount Furniture’s Carol Glaser Receives Top Women in Retail Supply Chain Award   •   O’Charley’s Announces ‘Drive For 5’ Promotion and NASCAR Sweepstakes with Coca-Cola Company   •   Saving Lives One Mammogram at a Time, VNA Launches its ‘Worth the Squeeze’ Initiative   •   RNR Tire Express Surprises Tampa-Area Woman with New Car in Mother's Day Giveaway   •   Global Surrogacy Services Announces Outreach to Potential Gestational Surrogates in Three Southwestern States   •   Equitable Bank Releases Inaugural ESG Performance Report   •   Five Bluum Standouts Honored on CRN 2022 Women of the Channel List   •   Maximus Names Robert Knapp as Senior Vice President of Digital Government Solutions   •   H-E-B Edges Out Amazon as the Top U.S. eCommerce Grocery Retailer, dunnhumby Retailer Preference Index Finds   •   Luchadores and Superheroes Featured in Colorful COVID-19 Ad Campaigns   •   Four recipients of the 2022 Awards of Excellence in Nursing announced from Indigenous Services Canada   •   Checkmarx' Ana Lucia Amaral Honored as a CRN 2022 Woman of the Channel
Bookmark and Share

DOD Wants "Long-Range" Look At DADT Policy

WASHINGTON  -- The Defense Department supports the federal appeals court decision to temporarily block a judge's order that put an immediate end to the so-called "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" law that bans gay men and lesbians from serving openly in the military.

"For the reasons stated in the government's submission, we believe a stay is appropriate," said Pentagon spokeswoman Cynthia Smith of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision.

The three-judge panel yesterday issued a statement which noted that it allowed the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" law to stand to provide more time to study the issues involved in its possible repeal. The court set an Oct. 25 deadline for both sides to submit legal documents for consideration.

The higher-court decision temporarily suspends U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips' Oct. 12 ruling that the law is unconstitutional. Judge Phillips issued an injunction requiring the department "immediately to suspend and discontinue any investigation, or discharge, separation or other proceeding that may have commenced under the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' act or its implementing regulations."

In its appeal, Justice Department officials asked that the law be reinstated, at least until a study of the impact of repealing it is completed.

Defense Department officials want a deliberative, long-range look at any changes in the law, said Pentagon spokesman Marine Corps Col. David Lapan.

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates set up a working group to examine the ramifications of a possible repeal of the law.

The group is scheduled to submit its report Dec. 1.

"The review that is going on would look at all the far-ranging impacts of what changing the law would mean," Colonel Lapan said.

A long-range plan for changing the law would include a period of transition to conduct training to ensure that everyone was informed about new policies and procedures, he said.

In response to Judge Phillips' ruling, Pentagon officials had instructed recruiters to begin processing paperwork for openly gay men or lesbians to apply to serve in the military. But citing uncertainty over final disposition of the matter in the courts and on Capitol Hill, Mrs. Smith warned at the time that potential applicants needed to be aware that the situation could change, as it has with the Oct. 20 appellate court decision.

 


STORY TAGS: GENERAL , BLACKS , AFRICAN AMERICAN , LATINO , HISPANIC , MINORITIES , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , DIVERSITY , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News