May 28, 2020         
Schools in the Driver’s Seat: K12 Learning Solutions to Provide Tailored Online Education Services   •   Rebif® U.S. Label Now Includes Pregnancy Outcomes and Lactation Information to Help Inform Treatment Decisions for Women wit   •   Our Sunday Best Wins Platinum & Gold Hermes Creative Awards 2020   •   Analyst Report Outlines How Phone Number Data Can be Used for Fraud Mitigation and Risk Assessment   •   World Economic Forum report recognizes key critical infrastructure innovations from Smart Wires, ABB and Siemens   •   Diestel Family Ranch Acquires Willie Bird Turkeys Brand   •   Caring.com Ranks Safest States for Seniors During COVID-19   •   MOSSVILLE: When Great Trees Fall Premieres on PBS Reel South - Intimate Documentary Exposes Link Between Race and Environmental   •   Senior Home Care Helps Keep Seniors Safe and Reduces the Spread of the Virus   •   Pacific Neuropsychiatric Specialists to Offer Discounted COVID-19 Antibody Testing   •   The Society For The Promotion Of Japanese Animation Announces First Ever Anime Expo Lite - A Virtual Japanese Pop Culture Event   •   Retired USMC Captain, Derek Herrera, to Take Chairman Role for MVPvets, a Nonprofit That Helps Military Veterans Find Careers in   •   CORRECTING and REPLACING Moviegoers Excited to Return to Theaters If Social Distancing and Safety Guidelines Are Met   •   Jeunesse Receives 24 Awards in 2020 Communicator Competition   •   Guidehouse and #NatSecGirlSquad Analyze State of Diversity in National Security   •   Brookdale to Present at the Jefferies 2020 Virtual Healthcare Conference   •   Maria Sophocles, MD, Empowers Women to Reclaim Power Over Their Period   •   Boulder Crest Foundation Updates Name and Branding to Reflect Broader Mission   •   AHF Mourns Passing of AIDS Warrior and Playwright Larry Kramer   •   Digital and Virtual Wedding Planning at an All-Time High as Couples and Wedding Pros Navigate New Reality During COVID-19 Pandem
Bookmark and Share

Election Results Demonstrates "A United Tribe"

 SANTA YNEZ, CA - For the seventh election in a row, Vincent Armentawas re-elected to the role of Tribal Chairman for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians.  He ran unopposed in this election.


"Now in my 12th year as a Tribal Chairman, I am honored that my fellow tribal members have the confidence in me to continue to lead our tribal nation," said Chairman Armenta.  "The past dozen years have been the most exciting years of my life.  I have significantly expanded my knowledge of government, business, community and our tribe's own culture and history in order to better serve my tribe."

Also re-elected in the tribal election last week were incumbent Business Committee members David DominguezRichard GomezKenneth Kahn and Gary Pace.

The tribe's Chairman and Business Committee are responsible for establishing policies and overseeing the legal and business affairs of the tribe, while providing for the economic well being of its members.  The Business Committee must obtain approval from the general council (the tribal membership) of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians for issues regarding managing and directing tribal revenue.  The tribe elects members of its Business Committee, including Tribal Chairman, every two years.

"I'm especially pleased that the entire leadership team was re-elected," said Chairman Armenta.  "We have worked together as a board overseeing the business aspects of our tribe for nearly five years and we are all looking forward to continuing to build a solid foundation for future generations of our tribe."

Since he was first elected to the role of Tribal Chairman in 1999, Chairman Armenta has participated in the tribe's significant success in its business enterprises, along with its success in cultural preservation.  From developing and operating a popular destination resort to resurrecting its native language, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians has taken significant steps forward under the leadership of Chairman Armenta.

"Along with my fellow Business Committee members, we have made decisions that have placed our tribe among one of the most successful in the state," said Chairman Armenta.  "We're extremely proud of the work we have done on behalf of our tribe."

The four other tribal members who were re-elected to the Business Committee also have significant experience as tribal leaders.

Gomez, who has been involved in tribal politics for decades, was re-elected to his eighth consecutive term on the tribe's leadership team.  In the past two terms, Gomez served as Vice Chairman.

Kahn and Pace were both elected to their fifth terms.  Dominguez, who served as Tribal Chairman for nearly a decade in the 1990s, was re-elected to his fourth term as a Business Committee member.

"All of us are here to serve the tribe for all generations," said Gomez. "The actions we take today have an impact on our future generations, so we weigh every decision carefully, knowing that our tribal membership entrusts us with their future."

Kahn, who has served as the Secretary/Treasurer on the Business Committee, said that these are exciting times for the tribe.  "Together our leadership team has accomplished so much," said Kahn.  "Now that we have all been re-elected, we will continue to achieve our goals on behalf of the tribe."

Pace said that since he was first elected to serve on the Business Committee in 2004, he has dedicated his life to ensuring that the tribe is successful in its business enterprises, its cultural preservation projects and in its work in the community.  "I am enthusiastic about continuing to build on the momentum we have going as a united team."

Dominguez agreed that there was significant unity in this leadership team.  "The fact that we were all re-elected sends a clear message that our tribal membership is satisfied with what we have accomplished as a board," he said.

Tribal members nominated candidates for Tribal Chairman and Business Committee in the tribe's monthly general council meeting in February.  Ballots were mailed to eligible voting tribal members (21 years of age and older) and members were also given the option of voting in person on March 3 at the Tribal Hall.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians owns and operates the Chumash Casino Resort on its reservation.  The tribe also owns Hotel Corque and Root 246 in Solvang.  As the largest employer in the Santa Ynez Valley, the tribe employs more than 1,600 residents of Santa Barbara County.


STORY TAGS: Native American News, Indian News, Native News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News