September 28, 2020         
In response to Governor Newsom signing Assembly Bill 2149 into law Postmates along with other concerned parties, Dine Black LA a   •   Curative Researchers Initiate Research Study to Test Efficacy of Self-Collected COVID-19 Tests   •   Cubic Introduces New Ventra Mobile App for Chicagoland Travelers   •   Association of Independent Mortgage Experts Partners with United Wholesale Mortgage and Home Point Financial to Introduce Small   •   Prospera Celebrates Local Hispanic-Owned, Small Businesses   •   Author Ted Rupnik's new book "Three Willie" is a charming children's story with an important lesson about accountability and com   •   Frog Street Offers Extensive "At-Home Learning" Resources to Help Children Stay Engaged in New Hybrid Learning Environments   •   Books-A-Million Honors U.S. Military with Coffee for the Troops Program Through October 24   •   The Return of the Pope of Buddhism Scepter by His Holiness Dorje Chang Buddha III was Rejected   •   ADEA Statement in Support of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Workplace Training   •   Laird Superfood Announces Closing of Initial Public Offering and Exercise in Full of the Underwriters’ Option to Purchase   •   Statement by the Prime Minister on Yom Kippur   •   Mark Your Calendars! Prime Day Is Here in Time for the Holidays on October 13 & 14   •   C-Sweet Webinar: “How We Can Make Difference” Part Three in a Series on Why Diversity Matters   •   TherapeuticsMD Provides Update on Third Quarter Progress   •   AHF Rings Alarm Over Nationwide Shortage of STD Test Kits   •   Statement by Minister Chagger on Yom Kippur   •   Pres. Donald Trump to speak on Friday Night at Family Research Council Action's Values Voter Summit 2020   •   LegalShield Leadership Convention, Lead the Change, to Bring Record Number of Associates Together Virtually   •   ERLC President Russell Moore Affirms Amy Coney Barrett as SCOTUS Justice Nominee
Bookmark and Share

Feds Fight Drugs In Indian Country

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.,  -- White House Office of National Drug Control Policy Director Gil Kerlikowsketoday unveiled a new anti-methamphetamine (meth) ad campaign tailored for Indian Country, launched in New Mexico and in 14 other states with the largest Native American populations.

Director Kerlikowske was joined by Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Larry Echo Hawk; Southwest Area Vice President of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), Joe Garcia; Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ron Sims; and Secretary of the New Mexico Indian Affairs Department, Alvin Warren.

According to national data, meth use rates for American Indian/Alaska Native populations remain among the highest of any ethnicity – almost two times higher than other groups, according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.  Specifically, American Indians or Alaska Natives are almost twice as likely to have used meth in the past year than whites (1.1 vs. 0.6 percent) or Hispanics (1.1 vs. 0.6 percent), and approximately five times more likely to have used meth than African Americans (1.1 vs. 0.2 percent).

"The data about methamphetamine abuse in the Native American community are troubling," said Kerlikowske.  "This ad campaign will supplement the important work for prevention and treatment already being done by the Native American community, local prevention groups, law enforcement, and treatment providers."  

The Native American Anti-Meth Campaign, in its third year coordinated by ONDCP's National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, is the only national anti-meth advertising campaign tailored to reach both youth and adults in Indian Country and Alaska Native lands.  The campaign includes TV commercials, print and radio ads, and billboard advertising in 15 states:  Alaska, Arizona,IdahoMichiganMinnesotaMontanaNew MexicoNorth DakotaOklahomaOregonWyomingSouth DakotaWashington,Wisconsin, and Utah.  The ads will run until August, and Native groups and others will be able to download and use the ads as free PSAs in their local communities.  

The advertising builds on Native American culture and pride.  For youth, the advertising materials have a unifying, empowering message celebrating Native American culture and giving them reasons not to use meth.  For adults and elders, the materials encourage them to take appropriate steps to protect their children.  The campaign was developed through comprehensive research and testing with members of the target audience – adults and elders on Native lands in AlaskaArizonaNew Mexico, and South Dakota. The research was conducted with help from the Native Wellness Institute (NWI) and the advertisements were developed by a Native-owned advertising agency, Alternative Marketing Solutions (AMS).

"This ad campaign is very important to Indian Country," said Larry Echo Hawk, Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs for the U.S. Department of the Interior.  "Drug abuse is always a disturbing issue to confront for any community, and methamphetamine abuse is something we need to address with an aggressive approach."

"We are so pleased to be working together with ONDCP's National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign and leaders from Native American organizations on this important initiative to reach out to Native teens around the country," said Joe Garcia, Vice Chairman of the National Congress of American Indians.  "This is an opportunity to initiate community-wide conversations about issues of crucial importance to our families, including substance abuse."  

Meth is an addictive stimulant drug that can be taken orally, injected, snorted, or smoked. Often called "speed" or "ice," meth is available as a crystal-like powdered substance or in large rock-like chunks.  Meth users are prone to violence and neglectful behavior that can affect their children and neighbors.  The chemicals used in meth production are flammable and highly toxic, posing a threat to both the environment and residents.

For more information about the Native American Anti-Meth Campaign, to view advertising and other resources, and to learn about how to order free PSAs, visit www.methresources.gov.  

Since its inception in 1998, the ONDCP's National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign has conducted outreach to millions of parents, teens, and communities to prevent and reduce teen drug use.  Counting on an unprecedented blend of public and private partnerships, non-profit community service organizations, volunteerism, and youth-to-youth communications, the Campaign is designed to reach Americans of diverse backgrounds with effective anti-drug messages.

 

SOURCE White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News