Today's Date: April 22, 2024
First of its Kind Partnership Delivers a Waste Heat to Power Project That Will Reduce the University of Dayton’s Carbon Fo   •   The Sister Accord® Foundation Celebrates New Chapter in Partnership with the Nelson Mandela Foundation   •   BuzzFeed, Inc. to Release First Quarter 2024 Financial Results on Monday, May 13, 2024   •   2023 Sustainability Report Demonstrates Canfor Pulp and Canfor's Continued ESG Performance   •   Coke Florida Celebrates Earth Day with Statewide Sustainability and Conservation Activities   •   Announcing the Fifth Annual Women in Horticulture Week: A Celebration of Women's Progress and Empowerment in the Green Industry   •   Alterra Mountain Company Releases Its 2023 Impact Report   •   AUSTRALIAN BATTERY MATERIALS INNOVATOR ANNOUNCES US EXPANSION   •   JBG SMITH Releases 2024 Sustainability Report   •   Sallie Mae Declares Dividends on Preferred Stock Series B and Common Stock   •   Quaker Houghton Releases its 2023 Sustainability Report   •   PG&E Customers' Electricity 100% Greenhouse Gas-Free in 2023   •   2023 Sustainability Report Demonstrates Canfor and Canfor Pulp's Continued ESG Performance   •   Resilient Waters Fund Wins the 2024 Kellogg-Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge   •   AMERICAN BATTLEFIELD TRUST CRESTS 50,000 STUDENTS SENT ON CLASS TRIPS TO HISTORIC SITES ACROSS THE NATION   •   iSun, Inc. Announces Restructuring of Executive Team   •   Vasta Platform Limited to Report First Quarter 2024 Financial Results on May 08, 2024   •   Seagate Drives Progress on Its Renewable Energy and Circularity Programs   •   BOARDWALK RELEASES 2023 ESG REPORT   •   Green Seal Releases 2024 Impact Report Showing Meaningful Plastic, Water, Carbon Savings from Certified Products
Bookmark and Share

Giving Birth Increases Cancer Risks For Blacks

WASHINGTON — Results from the Black Women's Health Study show two or more full-term births are linked to a higher incidence of certain breast cancers in Black women, but only in those who did not breast-feed

Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, Women News, Minority News, Discrimination, Diversity, Female, Underrepresented, Equality, Gender Bias, EqualityThe study is being reported online in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

"African-American women are more likely to have had a greater number of full-term births and less likely to have breastfed their babies," said lead author Julie R. Palmer, ScD, professor of epidemiology at the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts, in a news release. "This study shows a clear link between that and hormone receptor-negative breast cancer."

The study cohort consisted of 59,000 African American women observed with biennial questionnaires. Review of pathology data confirmed 457 incident cases of ER+/PR+ and 318 cases of ER−/PR− breast cancer from 1995 through 2009. Proportional hazards regression models controlling for age, reproductive characteristics, and risk factors for breast cancer allowed determination of hazard ratios (HRs) and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the incidence of breast cancer subtypes.

The risk for ER−/PR− breast cancer was increased with higher parity (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.98 - 1.84 for 3+ vs 0 births; P = .009 for trend), whereas the risk for ER+/PR+ cancer was decreased (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.39 - 0.73 for 3+ vs 0 births; P = .0002 for trend). High parity was not associated with an increased incidence of ER−/PR− breast cancer among women who had breast-fed, but the inverse association with ER+/PR+ cancer was still present.

"The adverse effect of high childbirth without subsequent breast-feeding seems to be confined to the hormone receptor–negative breast cancer, which carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in African-Americans," Dr. Palmer said.

Limitations of this study include possible selection bias, inability to assess subtypes according to HER2 expression, and limited ability to evaluate associations by duration of breast-feeding because most participants who had breast-fed had done so for a total of less than 12 months.

"The higher incidence of ER−/PR− breast cancer in African American women may be explained in part by their higher parity and lower prevalence of breastfeeding relative to white women," the study authors conclude. "Increased breastfeeding may lead to a reduction in the incidence of this breast cancer subtype."
 


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, Women News, Minority News, Discrimination, Diversity, Female, Underrepresented, Equality, Gender Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News