February 19, 2020         
7,000 Bacardi Employees Turn on Their ‘Out of Office’ to Visit Hundreds of Bars Across the Globe to Spark Conversati   •   iPhone 11 Pro doubles radiation exposure deemed safe for consumers, according to new test   •   Hemp Depot Redefines U.S. CBD Farming Economics With 70% Reduction in Feminized Seed Pricing   •   Lovers, Sub a Sandwich for a Ring This Leap Day and Quiznos May Cater Your Wedding – Assuming They Say “Yes”!   •   Free Dental Care for Kids at GDA Foundation Give Kids a Smile Day   •   To Honor World Cancer Day, The WISDOM Study Seeks Support from Women to Modernize Breast Screening Guidelines   •   Bounce to World Premiere New Original Black History Month Special Starring Queen Latifah, Common and Harry Belafonte Monday, Feb   •   EWA Is Proud to Announce That Voviette Morgan, Special Agent in Charge, Los Angeles Office FBI, Has Been Selected for the EWA Ja   •   To Honor World Cancer Day, The WISDOM Study Seeks Support from Women to Modernize Breast Screening Guidelines   •   Make Vision Care a Priority in 2020   •   New ESA ‘Game Generation’ Campaign Shows Video Game Play Brings Benefits Beyond Fun   •   Comcast Celebrates the Year of the Rat With Continued Sponsorship of San Francisco’s Chinese New Year Festival & Parad   •   Santa Maria Philharmonic Presents Annual Youth Showcase   •   The Author Incubator Launches New Program for Spanish Speaking Entrepreneurs   •   MISSION BBQ Customers Donate $350,420 to Wreaths Across America   •   M&T Bank Designated as a Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality   •   Cruise Planners' CEO and Founder Michelle Fee Inducted into Sandals Resort International's Hall of Fame as Strong Female Executi   •   AARP Nevada And Las Vegas Review-Journal Partner For Nevada Caucus Voter Education Campaign And Event   •   Fulton Mortgage Company Honored With First Annual Community Revitalization Award in Philadelphia   •   Inspīr Carnegie Hill Appoints Renowned New York University Neuroscientist, Dr. Wendy Suzuki to Advisory Board
Bookmark and Share

Hispanics High On Life, Not Drugs, Alcohol

 ROCKVILLE, MD - A new national study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reveals that Hispanic-American adults have lower levels of current alcohol use than the national average (46.1 percent versus 55.2 percent). Hispanic-American adults also have lower levels of current illicit drug use than the national average (6.6 percent versus 7.9 percent), but a slightly higher level of current binge drinking (26.3 percent versus 24.5 percent).

Hispanic-American adults also have a slightly higher rate of past year need for alcohol treatment than the national average (8.7 percent versus 8.1 percent). About 7.9 percent of Hispanic-American adults needing alcohol treatment in the past year received it at specialty facilities, about the same rate as the national average of 8.2 percent.

The SAMHSA study also shows there are significant differences in rates of substance use among various Hispanic-American adult populations. For example, Spanish-American adults have a level of past month alcohol use above the national average, and 50 percent higher than the rate for Dominican–American adults (60.8 percent versus 40.3 percent). Similarly, the rate of current illicit drug use among Spanish-American adults is nearly three times higher than the level among Dominican-American adults (13.1 percent versus 3.9 percent). Current binge drinking rates among Hispanic-American adult populations range from a high of 28.7 percent among Puerto Rican adults to 20.8 percent among Central or South American –American adults.

The study also shows that U.S. born Hispanic-American adults have much higher substance use rates than Hispanic–Americans adults born outside the U.S. For example, the past month binge drinking level among U.S. born Hispanic-American adults is almost a third higher among native born Hispanic-Americans than among their foreign born counterparts (57.7 percent versus 37.2 percent), and the past month illicit drug use level among U.S. born Hispanic-American adults is more than triple the rate found among foreign born Hispanic-Americans (11.3 percent versus 3.0 percent).

The study was developed as part of the agency’s strategic initiative on prevention as well as data, outcomes, and quality – an effort to create an integrated data strategy that informs policy makers and service providers on the nature and scope of behavioral health issues. It is one in a series of studies designed to provide more detailed information on substance abuse patterns and treatment needs existing within a wide range of minority groups.

“Hispanic-Americans are one of the fastest growing communities in our country and include a vast array of diverse populations – each with a unique set of behavioral health strengths, challenges and needs,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde, J.D. This study and others indicate that as ethnic and immigrant populations become more acculturated into our national culture they tend to develop many of the same behavioral health challenges faced by the general population. Through a more detailed understanding of this diverse community we can better tailor our prevention and treatment strategies to reach all of its members.”

Substance Use among Hispanic Adults is based on data drawn from the 2004 to 2008 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, involving responses from 227,791 persons aged 18 or older, including 31,848 Hispanic-American adults. The full report is available on line at:http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/2k9/164/Hispanics.htm


SAMHSA is a public health agency within the Department of Health and Human Services. Its mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities.

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News