Today's Date: December 7, 2022
WWE’s “Next In Line” Program Partners With Exos   •   VANCO, BAPTIST GENERAL ASSOCIATION OF VIRGINIA (BGAV) TEAM UP FOR IMPACTFUL ONLINE GIVING EXPERIENCE   •   AVG Group Sarl to Issue Third Dividend and Launches LATAM Office   •   Whirlpool Corporation Ranks Number Three in Newsweek's List of America's 500 Most Responsible Companies for 2023   •   Schneider Electric and ORPC Join Forces to Advance Marine Energy as a Renewable Energy Source for Remote Communities   •   Generate Biomedicines Demonstrates a Novel Method of Reducing Immunogenicity through Protein Re-surfacing   •   Marsha P. Johnson Institute to Celebrate Acclaimed Black Artists and the Power of Resistance With Nick Cave, Jack Cave and Micha   •   Government of Canada recognizes the breaking of racial barriers in the NHL as an event of national historic significance   •   Activision Blizzard Releases YTD 2022 Representation Data   •   OAKTREE STRATEGIC INVESTOR ALERT by the Former Attorney General of Louisiana: Kahn Swick & Foti, LLC Investigates Merger of   •    Prime Health Services Announces Acquisition of InterGroup Services Provider Network   •   REP. LINDA SÁNCHEZ SELECTED AS CONGRESSIONAL BONE HEALTH CHAMPION AWARD WINNER FOR "OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP, ADVOCACY AND   •   BLACK ENTERPRISE To Host Virtual 40 Under 40 Summit Celebrating Professional Black Millennials on Dec. 8   •   Populus Financial Group Donates $15,000 to Junior Achievement; Volunteers Teach JA in a Day   •   Blue Shield of California Introduces At-Home Care Services to Accommodate Members' Busy Lives   •   Coastal Medical Transportation Systems Completes Acquisition of Transformative Healthcare’s Massachusetts Medical Transpor   •   Minister of Health visits Quebec City to discuss the new, interim Canada Dental Benefit   •   PALMER'S RELEASES FIRST BRAND CAMPAIGN IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE SASHA GROUP   •   ESF Seafood Transforms Shrimp Processing With Industry Leading Renewable Energy Conversion   •   Earnin Strengthens Team with Heavy Hitting Legal Lineup
Bookmark and Share

Hormones Pinpointed At Putting Blacks At Higher Risk For High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure also called hypertension is a major health problem that when left untreated can lead to heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. African Americans are more likely to develop high blood pressure and develop it earlier in life than Caucasians. But the reasons for the heightened risk in African Americans still remained largely unknown, although new evidence may provide some insight.

Dr. TanYa Gwathmey from the Hypertension and Vascular Research Center of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center studies the factors that contribute to having high blood pressure, particularly in African Americans. Her group found that there are racial differences in the activity of enzymes that make or breakdown a major regulator of blood pressure. And her results correlate with the bias of African Americans being more at risk.

At the annual 2010 Experimental Biology conference in Anaheim, CA held April 24-28 (http://experimentalbiology.org/content/default.aspx), Gwathmey will be discussing these findings in her presentation titled "Sex and Racial Background Influence Angiotensin Peptide Metabolism in Young Adults." The team of researchers that also contributed to this study includes Hossam Shaltout and Mark Chappell of the Hypertension and Vascular Research Center; James Rose of the Center for Perinatal Research; Lisa Washburn of the Department of Pediatrics from the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center; and Patricia Nixon of the Department of Health and Exercise Science of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC.

Two Peptides With Opposing Function Blood pressure is regulated by peptides (short strings of amino acids) called angiotensins. Specific forms of angiotensin affect blood pressure differently. Angiotensin II causes the body to retain salt and water and causes blood vessels to constrict; all characteristics that promote high blood pressure. On the other hand, angiotensin (1-7) has protective effects against high blood pressure by causing blood vessels to open up and allowing the body to release salt and water.

The enzyme ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) makes the riskier angiotensin II. But angiotensin II can be converted to the protective angiotensin (1-7) by the enzyme ACE2. So someone with high ACE activity would make more angiotensin II and would be more at risk for high blood pressure. Alternatively, someone with higher ACE2 activity would make more angiotensin (1-7) and would not be as likely to develop high blood pressure.

High Risk Individuals Have Differences In Angiotensin Hormone Metabolism During adolescence, most individuals haven't developed high blood pressure yet. Gwathmey chose to study participants at age 15 to identify predicting factors of high blood pressure that may be present before the disease has set in. Gwathmey's study specifically examined African American boys and girls and Caucasian girls. All participants tested had normal blood pressure. Urine samples were collected from the participants and analyzed for levels of ACE and ACE2 enzymes as a read-out for the predominant form of angiotensin.

African American boys had higher ACE levels than both African American and Caucasian girls, meaning the African American boys may have higher levels of angiotensin II. Researchers also observed that African American girls had less ACE2 than Caucasian girls, meaning they may make less of the protective angiotensin (1-7) hormone. To put it more simply, African American boys have more of the enzyme that makes the hormone that contributes to high blood pressure and African American girls have less of the enzyme that makes the hormone that protects against high blood pressure or hypertension.

"What is really interesting to me is that we are seeing changes in angiotensin metabolism before blood pressure changes," Gwathmey said. "This could become a useful tool for predicting high pressure and potential therapeutic treatment before hypertension actually sets in."

Researchers are recruiting more participants to make this study more comprehensive. In the future studies, Gwathmey hopes to look at other contributors like obesity and certain dietary factors that may put African Americans at greater risk for high blood pressure than Caucasians.

"We can't group all people into one category to assess the blood pressure system," said Gwathmey. "If we look at a study without consideration of racial and/or gender influences, then we may be missing out on key information that may better help us to address this epidemic."

 

###
 Contact: Donna Krupa
media@faseb.org
714-765-2012
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News