Today's Date: February 28, 2021
Trust the Leader in Online School: Insight School of Kansas Accepting Enrollments for 2021-2022 School Year   •   BANDIER Now Available on Amazon   •   ChenMed Commits $100,000 to Address Issues Affecting Communities of Color   •   Western Union Foundation Supports Career & Leadership Pathways for Migrant and Refugee Youth   •   Make-A-Wish Recognizes Rare Disease Day with Oscar's Wish   •   NASA Celebrates 'Hidden Figure' Mary W. Jackson With Building Naming Ceremony   •   Connie Stacey Wins The Forum’s 2020/21 Pitch for the Purse, $50,000 Prize   •   Statement - Ministers of Veterans Affairs and National Defence mark 30th anniversary of the end of the Gulf War   •   BlackNorth Initiative's Dahabo Ahmed-Omer Earns Inaugural Business Changemakers Award From the Globe and Mail’s Report on   •   Lies Travel Faster Than Truth in New Peaky Blinders Card Game from Steamforged Games   •   Cloud Girls Extends Nomination Deadline for Sixth Annual 'Women to Watch' Awards   •   Study: Staffing Industry Sees Gender Parity but Wide Pay Gap Still Persists   •   Vaquero Private Wealth Increases Its Dallas Presence With the Addition of The Maynard Group   •   Assisting Hands Arlington Heights Receives an "Assisting Hand" from SCORE   •   Vice President Kamala Harris Calls NASA Astronaut Victor Glover   •   Casting Workbook Español Launched as Part of New Global Expansion Effort to Support Spanish Talent Worldwide   •   New Study Reveals Baby Boomers Turning to International E-Commerce, but With Different Expectations Than Younger Consumers   •   CGTN: Classics quoted by Xi Jinping: How to strive for excellence in life?   •   Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware Launches Mobile Billboard to Expose Racial Inequality in the Chancery Court   •   Canada, British Columbia and Tlowitsis Nation Advance to Final Stage of Treaty Negotiations
Bookmark and Share

House Votes To Defund NPR


WASHINGTON - NPR is expressing grave concern about the impact of the approval of H.R. 1076 on the entire public radio system – hundreds of stations, dozens of program producers and the communities that rely on them every week. The bill is a direct effort to weaken public radio that would ultimately choke local stations’ ability to serve their audiences.

 

Many small-budget stations would be placed in a serious financial bind. They would no longer be allowed to purchase any programming with federal funds. The communities they serve would be unable to provide sufficient support to fill that gap, leaving these stations no options for maintaining service.

 

“At a time when other news organizations are cutting back and the voices of pundits are drowning out fact-based reporting and thoughtful analysis, NPR and public radio stations are delivering in-depth news and information respectfully and with civility. It would be a tragedy for America to lose this national treasure,” said Joyce Slocum, Interim CEO.

 

The bill stunts the growth of new, diverse programming and threatens the continuation of existing efforts to serve diverse audiences by clamping down on CPB’s Program Fund. That fund has supported the work of Native American (Koahnik Public Media Native Voice 1), Latino (Radio Bilingue) and independent producers (This I Believe, StoryCorps).

 

The bill also prohibits the use of federal funds to develop new programs. Nearly every nationally distributed public radio program has received a CPB grant, usually at start-up. (Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Marketplace, This American Life, and Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! to name a few). Without that seed money, programs that nearly 38 million public radio listeners rely on each week would never have launched.

 

The legislation precludes NPR from competing for federal grants that provide for investments in technology and disability access. These grants, administered by NPR on behalf of public radio, have propelled public radio’s progress in digital media, and in systems for emergency communications during disasters and for the issuance of AMBER alerts.

 

The ban on federal funding threatens the Public Radio Satellite System (PRSS), the distribution hub for all of public radio programming to audiences all across America. PRSS would be deprived of funds for future capital improvement projects, which are essential to maintain this fundamental broadcast infrastructure.

 

Finally, the bill limits collaboration among stations that today are sharing newsgathering and programming, forcing these stations into isolation and limiting their ability to work together in the public interest. 


STORY TAGS: NPR , H.R. 1076

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News