Today's Date: May 22, 2022
Tia Extends “Whole Woman, Whole Life” Care Model With Fertility Services   •   Global Surrogacy Services Announces Outreach to Potential Gestational Surrogates in Three Southwestern States   •   Five Bluum Standouts Honored on CRN 2022 Women of the Channel List   •   Tracey Hayes from MicroAge Named on CRN's 2022 Women of the Channel Power 70 Solution Providers List   •   TherapeuticsMD Receives U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approval for Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for ANNOVE   •   Checkmarx' Ana Lucia Amaral Honored as a CRN 2022 Woman of the Channel   •   Mrs. Flowers Takes the Helm at Comfort Home Care, Rockville, MD   •   Merz Aesthetics Partners With North Carolina Courage of the National Women's Soccer League to Fuel Confidence on and off the fie   •   Steve and Marjorie Harvey Establish the Legacy Ranch in Upson County, Georgia - Building on The Rock Ranch founded by the Cathy   •   NCCI Golf Event Generates $25,000 for Kids' Chance of America Scholarships   •   Equitable Bank Releases Inaugural ESG Performance Report   •   RNR Tire Express Surprises Tampa-Area Woman with New Car in Mother's Day Giveaway   •   Closing the Health Disparity Gap for Black Women   •   Sallie Mae’s Latest Corporate Social Responsibility Report Highlights Commitment to Customers, Communities, Employees, an   •   Four recipients of the 2022 Awards of Excellence in Nursing announced from Indigenous Services Canada   •   Eastern Bank Welcomes New Members To Its Board of Advisors and Board of Ambassadors   •   Jeunesse Garners 8 Gold Stevies in 2022 American Business Awards   •   Albertsons Companies, in cooperation with Smithfield Packaged Meats Corp., voluntarily recalls select ReadyMeals and deli-prepar   •   Igloo Releases New Playmate Coolers Inspired by Legendary Rapper The Notorious B.I.G.   •   Belgard Canada Celebrates Canada Day With a Backyard Giveaway
Bookmark and Share

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries Latinos


Report Materials

HISPANIC
LATINO
MEXICAN
MINORITY
CIVIL RIGHTS
DISCRIMINATION
RACISM
DIVERSITY
LATINA
RACIAL EQUALITY
BIAS
EQUALITY Complete Report

HISPANIC
LATINO
MEXICAN
MINORITY
CIVIL RIGHTS
DISCRIMINATION
RACISM
DIVERSITY
LATINA
RACIAL EQUALITY
BIAS
EQUALITY

WASHINGTON - The national political backlash against illegal immigration has created new divisions among Latinos and heightened their concerns about discrimination against members of their ethnic group-including those who were born in the United States or who immigrated legally.

About four-in-five of the nation's estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants are of Hispanic origin. A new national survey by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, finds that Latinos are divided over what to do with these immigrants. A small majority (53%) says they should pay a fine but not be deported. A small minority (13%) says they should be deported, and a larger minority (28%) says they should not be punished.

Hispanics are also divided about the impact of illegal immigration on Hispanics already living in the U.S. Roughly equal shares say the impact has been positive (29%), negative (31%) or made no difference (30%). This mixed judgment stands in sharp contrast to views that Latinos expressed on this subject in 2007. Back then, fully half (50%) of Latinos said the impact was positive, while just 20% said it was negative.[1]

Today, more than six-in-ten (61%) Latinos say that discrimination against Hispanics is a "major problem," up from 54% who said that in 2007. Asked to state the most important factor leading to discrimination, a plurality of 36% now cites immigration status, up from a minority of 23% who said the same in 2007. Back then, a plurality of respondents-46%-identified language skills as the biggest cause of discrimination against Hispanics.

In the new survey, Latinos are also split over whether immigrant and native-born Latinos are working together to achieve common political goals. About half (45%) say they are, and half (46%) say they are not. Both the native born (who comprise 47% of the adult Latino population) and the foreign born (who comprise 53%) are roughly equally divided on their perceptions of political solidarity.

The native born and foreign born have different views on many topics explored in the survey. For example, seven-in-ten (70%) foreign-born Latinos say discrimination against Hispanics is a major problem preventing Latinos from succeeding in America. Less than half (49%) of the native born agree. And when it comes to their views of immigrants, fewer than seven-in-ten native-born Hispanics say immigrants strengthen the country, while 85% of immigrant Hispanics say the same.

At 47 million strong, Latinos are the nation's largest minority group, comprising nearly 15% of the total U.S. population. Some 38% of all Latinos are immigrants, and an estimated 19% are unauthorized  immigrants.

While the survey finds differences among Latinos on several questions related to illegal immigration, it also finds many points of broad agreement-especially when it comes to enforcement policies and proposals.

For example, fully 86% of Latinos support providing a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants if they pass background checks, pay a fine and have jobs, a level of support far greater than among the general public (68%). Among Latinos, about eight-in-ten (82%) of the native born and nine-in-ten (90%) of the foreign born say they support providing a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants.

On birthright citizenship, nearly eight-in-ten (78%) Latinos say the Constitution should be left as is, compared with 56% of the general public who say the same. And when it comes to who should enforce the nation's immigration laws, more than three-quarters (77%) Latinos say it should be the exclusive responsibility of federal authorities, while just 15% say the local police should play a more active role. On both questions, the native born and the foreign born hold similar views.

Finally, the vast majority of Latinos-79%-disapprove of the first-of-its-kind Arizona law enacted this year that gives police broad powers to check the immigration status of people they stop for other reasons whom they suspect may be in this country illegally.[2] By contrast, the general population approves of the measure by a ratio of two-to-one.

These and many other findings emerge from a new national survey of 1,375 Latino adults conducted by landline and cellular telephone, in English and Spanish, from August 17 through September 19, 2010. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.3 percentage points for the full sample and larger for subgroups. 

___________________________ 

[1] A slightly different question was asked three years ago. In 2007, survey respondents were asked about the impact of the "growing number of undocumented or illegal immigrants" on Latinos in the U.S. In 2010, since the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the U.S. has fallen (Passel and Cohn, 2010), the question instead asked about the effect of "undocumented or illegal immigration."

[2] Implementation of many parts of the new law has been stayed pending a hearing on a lawsuit brought by the federal government, which contends it is unconstitutional.


STORY TAGS: HISPANIC , LATINO , MEXICAN , MINORITY , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , DIVERSITY , LATINA , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News