September 21, 2020         
Kansas City Medical Center Breaks Ground For A New Fisher House In Missouri   •   Liona Enterprises, Inc. Ranks No. 1025 on the 2020 Inc. 5000 With Three-Year Revenue Growth of 452.14 Percent   •   Disney and Lucasfilm Announce “Mando Mondays” – A New Global Product Reveal Program in Celebration of “T   •   Sojournix Announces Publication of Results from SJX-653 Proof-of-Mechanism Study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &   •   Veuve Clicquot Announces the BOLD Woman Awards to Honour and Recognize Female Entrepreneurs   •   New York City Schools Can Now Order Eureka Math in Sync™, Wit & Wisdom in Sync™ from Great Minds® as Blended   •   Heart Valve Voice US to Train Patients As Research Advisors and Advocates   •   EpiFaith®, The Innovative Epidural Safeguard, Now Arrives in APAC Hospitals   •   Union Pacific Teams with Safe Kids Worldwide and Chuggington to Educate Families During National Rail Safety Week   •   Walmart sets goal to become a regenerative company   •   NBMBAA® Announces Its New President & CEO​   •   Northern Ontario First Nation Communities Reduce Fossil Fuel Use Through Forestry   •   Cooper Tire & Rubber Company Issues 2019 Global Sustainability Report   •   Mauldin & Jenkins Introduces New Service Offering, Sales Tax Simplified   •   Free Teacher-Funding Platform Empowers Single Donors and Communities to Support Their Local Schools and Educators - Classful.com   •   Charter Relaunches Free 60-Day Spectrum Internet & WiFi Offer To Help Connect New Households With K-12 And College Students   •   Susan G. Komen® Unveils “Live Pink” Program for 2020, Providing Easy Way to Support Fight Against Breast Cancer   •   PatientPoint Forms New Partnerships to Promote Research in Alzheimer's, Epilepsy at Point of Care   •   Boomer Naturals Announces Expansion of its Board of Directors   •   Girls Who Code and Apple Celebrate Day of the Girl
Bookmark and Share

Immigrants Making Progress Assimilating Into US

 

Washington.—Immigrants to the United States are assimilating at high rates, most notably by becoming citizens and homeowners in the first 18 years of residency, according to a study released by the Center for American Progress.

The study refutes claims from immigration opponents who question immigrants’ contributions to U.S. society and economy, and shows robust integration by newcomers since 1990, regardless of their social or economic starting points.

“This study affirms America’s history. Immigrants are not static in their assimilation. Despite claims to the contrary, history is repeating itself and today’s newcomers are becoming tomorrow’s new Americans,” said Angela M. Kelley, Vice President for Immigration Policy and Advocacy at the Center for American Progress.

The findings, based on U.S. Census Bureau data, are contained in the report, “Assimilation Today: New Evidence Shows the Latest Immigrants to America Are Following in Our History’s Footsteps,” by Dowell Myers and John Pitkin, of the University of Southern California’s Population Dynamics Research Group.

Assimilation by all foreign-born immigrants also is seen in their rising earning rates and high school completions. Children of Latino immigrants also are more likely than their parents to finish college, have good jobs, and own homes.

The nation’s latest immigrants are following in the footsteps of our ancestors, spreading out across the country and integrating in communities, large and small. And 14 states now have foreign-born populations above the national average of 12.5 percent, according to the study.

Many Americans believe immigrants are, like Peter Pan, forever frozen, and never advance economically or socially, but “the data on immigrant advancement may be surprising and should help dispel the illogical Peter Pan fallacy,” write the authors.

The report uses key benchmarks such as naturalization to citizenship, homeownership, and earnings to measure assimilation.

Among the findings:

  • There are now 14 states that have foreign-born populations greater than the national average share of 12.5 percent.
  • Immigrants are moving to new communities in 27 states where the populations of recently arrived immigrants make up at least 2 percent of the state population.
  • Latino immigrants, in the first 18 years of U.S. residency, swiftly attain the hallmark of the “American Dream“—homeownership—with 58 percent achieving this feat in 2008, up from only 9.3 percent of in 1990.
  • Latino immigrants in Arizona—ground zero for the national immigration debate—have proven much more successful than many assume. Two-thirds of immigrants are homeowners after 18 years of U.S. residence, just over 59 percent speak English well, and almost 58 percent earn better than a low income.

The assimilation rates can be found here.

###

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. We work to find progressive and pragmatic solutions to significant domestic and international problems and develop policy proposals that foster a government that is "of the people, by the people, and for the people."

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News