August 4, 2020         
NIH Awards $2.3 Million to The Lundquist Institute to Study the Impact of Vaping While Pregnant   •   Nextt Launches Healthcare Supplies Division to Provide Medical Grade PPE Products During Pandemic   •   COVID-19 putting millions of girls at risk of never returning to school   •   Newman's Own Gives $1 Million to Virtual Camp for Children with Serious Illnesses   •   Joni Wolfswinkel, CEO of Houston's Real Property Management Preferred Awarded as One of HousingWire Magazine's 2020 Women of Inf   •   Pastor Donte Hickman of the Southern Baptist Church and Senator Chris VanHollen (D-MD) collaborated on the Neighborhood Economic   •   Marler Clark, the Salmonella Lawyers, file the first Red Onion Salmonella Lawsuit against Thomson International   •   TeamDynamix Receives Three Top Rankings from Comparably 2020 Awards: Best CEO for Women, Best Leadership Team and Best Professio   •   Southern California Non-Profit Mourns The Death Of Two Beloved Board Members, Peter Devereaux and Bryan Stockton   •   Ramsey Press Begins Presale of Book Know Yourself, Know Your Money by Two-time #1 National Best-selling Author Rachel Cruze   •   The New USAFacts Coronavirus Impact and Recovery Hub Gives Americans a Free and Easy Way to Get Real-Time Facts They Can Count O   •   Citizens Bank Announces Grant Program for Minority-Owned Small Businesses   •   Canada Goose Announces First Quarter 2021 Earnings Release Date, Conference Call and Webcast   •   Akamai Technologies Joins Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council's Tech Compact for Social Justice   •   NewRez Senior Vice President, Debbie Knotts, Receives HousingWire’s Women of Influence Award   •   Non-Slip Earbuds From Letsfit and Freebit Ensure Better Workouts at an Affordable Price   •   GSBA And Comcast Washington Launch Ready for Business Fund to Support Small Businesses   •   St. Christopher's Inn Welcomes New Executive Director   •   AARP Pennsylvania to Mobilize Older Voters Ahead of 2020 Elections   •   Eye Level Literary Award 2020 for Aspiring Young Authors Goes Online
Bookmark and Share

Immigrants With Disabilities Find More Work Than Their US Born Counterparts







Currently, foreign-born people make up approximately 13 percent of the total U.S. population. As the immigrant population grows, understanding its disability status and employment characteristics becomes increasingly important. People, both native and foreign-born, with disabilities make important contributions to our society, and many individuals continue to work despite a wide range of impairments. A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital focuses on disability and employment among working-age immigrants in the United States. 


According to the study, released online in advance of print as an early view by the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, there were an estimated 24 million U.S. working-age adults with disabilities in 2007. Of these, 8.5 million (35 percent) were employed. The study revealed that for each type of disability, including sensory, physical, mental and emotional conditions, both foreign-born citizens with disabilities and non-citizens with disabilities were more likely than their U.S.-born counterparts to be employed. 


"The employment decisions of immigrants with disabilities may be impacted by eligibility for public assistance," explained Huiyun Xiang, MD, PhD, the study's lead author and principal investigator in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital. "Whereas U.S.-born people with disabilities have greater access to public assistance and may depend less on salary income. Also, eligibility for foreign-born people is complicated by length of residency, citizenship, refugee status, work history and other factors."


The two most common occupations for foreign-born people with disabilities were in production and cleaning/maintenance, while the two most common occupations for U.S.-born people with disabilities were in sales and office/administrative support. The study also showed that the median income for foreign-born persons with disabilities was $20,000; however, for U.S.-born people with disabilities, $22,000 was the median income. 


"People with disabilities often face a variety of barriers to employment, including limited access to public transportation, limited mobility in and around the workplace and societal prejudice or discrimination," said Dr. Xiang, also a faculty member of The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "However, English language proficiency is likely an additional barrier for immigrants with disabilities and may affect the occupational options available to them."


The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) works globally to reduce injury-related pediatric death and disabilities. With innovative research at its core, CIRP works to continually improve the scientific understanding of the epidemiology, biomechanics, prevention, acute treatment and rehabilitation of injuries. CIRP serves as a pioneer by translating cutting edge injury research into education, advocacy and advances in clinical care. To learn more about the Center for Injury Research and Policy, go to http://media.nationwidechildrens.org/?jrl=81569&clk=204797. While visiting our website, sign up for the RSS feed in the What's New section of our Media Center to receive e-mail updates of our latest news. 
 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News