August 11, 2020         
Ready to Go on Day One: Indiana Gateway Digital Academy Students Already Equipped for Success   •   Virtual Memory Screening Program Expanding to Meet Growing Demand   •   Sanctuary Taps Cinedigm and VIZIO to Bring Its Yoga Meditation Service to People at Home   •   Discovery Village at Naples' New Independent Living Community Wins Grand Aurora Award for Outstanding Architecture & Design   •   Nick Cannon Discusses Antisemitism, Black-Jewish Relations on AJC Advocacy Anywhere   •   Genentech Provides Update on Phase III Study of Tecentriq in Combination With Paclitaxel for People With Metastatic Triple-Negat   •   The Dan Marino Foundation And Badia Spices Partner To Raise Autism Awareness And Urge The Public To 'Be a Game Changer for those   •   WILLIAMS SONOMA AND NO KID HUNGRY PARTNER WITH CELEBRITIES TO LAUNCH THE TOOLS FOR CHANGE CAMPAIGN   •   Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Earns HAP Achievement Award   •   Trump Signs Specially Adaptive Housing Act Into Law   •   On Aug. 11 (8/11), Peoples Gas Reminds Floridians to Call 811 Before Starting Digging Projects   •   Virginia Mason and CHI Franciscan Open a New Birth Center to Expand Obstetric Care Options to Puget Sound Families   •   Medidata Congratulates ‘Tu Salud Tu Familia’ for Its Capital Emmy® Award   •   Cinedigm Expands Distribution of Fast Growing The Bob Ross Channel on XUMO Streaming Television Service   •   Talkspace Expands Affordable Mental Health Care Offering for 40 Million Americans via Insurance Coverage   •   2020 Women Tech Awards Finalists Named   •   Tech Lifestyle Expert, Stephanie Humphrey Releases First Book, "Don't Let Your Digital Footprint Kick You In The Butt!"   •   Brookdale Announces Second Quarter 2020 Results   •   Office Depot Unveils ‘powered by CompuCom’ to Provide SMBs with Scalable Technology and Service Solutions   •   Fort Worth-Based Galderma Donates 1,200 Backpacks Filled with School Supplies to Northwest ISD Students
Bookmark and Share

Latino Social Security Crisis

WASHINGTON -- Social Security is a critical income source for elderly and disabled Latinos because of their socioeconomic condition, higher rates of disability and longer life expectancy, according to a report published by the University of Southern California (USC) Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging.

“Social Security is currently the only robust, reliable source of retirement income for low-income workers, underscoring the importance of ensuring the program’s viability for current, future and retired Latino workers,” said USC Roybal Institute Executive Director William A. Vega, who co-authored the primer, commissioned by AARP, with Pre-Doctoral Fellow Zachary D. Gassoumis.

Latinos represent a significant percentage of working-class laborers in sectors with fluctuating seasonal employment, where occupational injuries and disabilities are common, and where there are fewer opportunities to participate in a workplace savings program. Both working age and older Latinos have higher rates of disability than non-Latino whites. Accordingly, the primer said, increasing the retirement age for Social Security would impose a significant and disproportionate financial burden on Latinos who retire early due to work-related health issues. 

Noting that LatinosÂ’ average life expectancy exceeds that of Americans overall, the report highlighted the importance of ensuring benefits to qualified Latinos are not eroded over time by inflation and continue to allow families to meet their basic financial necessities.

“We must stay true to the original intention of Social Security, and provide adequate resources for a sustainable and dignified retirement,” Vega said. “Given current unstable economic conditions, this will require a sufficiently flexible policy framework that will not render people with low incomes vulnerable to hardships that other Americans are not expected to endure.”

Almost half of all older Latinos would live in poverty without Social Security benefits; 25 percent of Latino men and 27 percent of Latinas aged 65 or older relied on Social Security for 90 percent or more of their family income, the report said. 

Although Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic group in the nation, they remain a relatively young population and will contribute to the Social Security system for many years to come without receiving benefits until decades later, the primer said.

“The promise of retirement security that Social Security provides for millions of Americans today is particularly significant to Latinos, both now and in the future, as demonstrated by this important research,” said AARP board member Fernando Torres-Gil. “This Roybal Institute report underscores the need for our elected officials to consider what impact any proposed changes to the program will have on all Americans as they work to strengthen retirement security for future generations.”

READ PRIMER HERE


STORY TAGS: social security , Hispanic News, Latino News, Mexican News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Latina, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News