Today's Date: August 16, 2022
Poll: Over Half of Voters of Color Oppose Government Negotiation of Drug Prices Once They Learn About Consequences for Patients   •   Test Release special characters in the headline © ® ™ é ñ ü ç î ò   •   Local Parents, Community Members Announce Plans to Open Classical K-12 Private School in Columbus, Ohio   •   Nation's Total Public School Enrollment Did Not Change from Fall 2020 to Fall 2021   •   Greenwood and Travis Hunter Sign NIL Deal and Partner to Launch the “Choose Black” Campaign   •   Children of America, Educational Childcare® Expands Its Footprint in Illinois   •   Key Study Analyzes Socially Beneficial Reporting Rates for Major Companies   •   LIBERTY Dental Plan of New York Awards 12 Scholarships in Partnership with PENCIL   •   Meyer Lucas Adds Listing Director, Promotes Marketing Director   •   Lorestry is the #1 New Pregnancy and Baby App for 2022   •   Global Garden Pesticides Market Outlook & Forecasts 2022-2027: Growth in Landscaping, Increase in Vector Borne Diseases, &am   •   Small Businesswoman Uses COVID-19 to Grow Company 300% in 24 Months   •   “What I Want to Know with Kevin P. Chavous” Podcast Launches Third Season in Search of Answers to Education’s   •   Mogul Launches Nationwide Campaign Called “Build Better Boards” to Champion More Diverse Boards   •   Count on Us Campaign Celebrates Latinos' Contributions to Arizona   •   Greenwood and Travis Hunter Sign NIL Deal and Partner to Launch the “Choose Black” Campaign   •   Premia Partners launches Asia's first USD hedged unit class for Chinese Government Bonds with its Premia China Treasury & Po   •   Test Release special characters in the headline © ® ™ é ñ ü ç î ò   •   LIBERTY Dental Plan of New York Awards 12 Scholarships in Partnership with PENCIL   •   Mogul Launches Nationwide Campaign Called “Build Better Boards” to Champion More Diverse Boards

Notice: Undefined index: currentSection in /home/blackradionetwork/public_html/page.php on line 176
Bookmark and Share

Most Houston Minorities Walk Or Bike To School

 

HOUSTON - Low-income, ethnic minority students from a large city like Houston commonly walk or bike to school, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Applied Research on Children:  Informing Policy for Children at Risk.

The new study also found that students who walked or biked to school were more likely to achieve higher levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity overall.

The high overall rate of walking and biking in this sample can be attributed to several causes, say the authors. For one, children living in an urban environment are likely to live within walking distance of school. Another possible factor could be that some low-income parents may not own a car, or may be likelier to have time constraints limiting their ability to drive children to and from school.

Relatively few of the students followed general recommendations for pedestrian safety. One in four did not go to the corner or use a crosswalk to cross; one in four ran across the street instead of walking; two-thirds did not stop at the curb before crossing; and less than three percent looked left-right-left before crossing the street. 

“From our sample, it appears that a lot of children in low-income, ethnic minority communities may walk and bike to school,” said Jason A. Mendoza, MD, MPH, of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, lead author of the study. “In many ways, this is a good thing. Members of these communities are at a higher risk of becoming obese, and active commuting can be part of a healthy and active lifestyle.”

Among the students studied – mostly Latino and Black fourth-graders in low-income schools in Houston, Texas – 43 percent of trips to school were made by either walking or biking. Recent national studies have shown that among the general U.S. population, just 13 percent of students walk or bike to school several times per week.

“The results of our study, combined with other evidence, lead us to believe that in many communities, more needs to be done to make it safer for kids to walk or bike to school,” said Mendoza. “Past research has shown that neighborhoods with centrally located schools, less traffic, and more sidewalks/trails, crosswalks and traffic lights make it safer for children to walk to school.”  
 
The study also found that a student’s cultural background may play a role in determining whether he or she walked or biked to school. Latino children were less likely than non-Latino children (82.5 percent of whom were non-Latino Black) to walk or bike to school. Moreover, Latino children who were more “acculturated” (had adopted more lifestyle habits from the mainstream U.S. culture) were less likely to walk or bike to school. “These findings could indicate that the adoption of American cultural norms somehow discourages active commuting among Latinos,” said Mendoza.

Past research has shown significant racial disparities in the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic: 38.2 percent of Latino children ages 2 to 19 are overweight or obese, as are 35.9 percent of Black children in that age group, compared with 31.7 percent of all children those ages. Obesity puts children at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, asthma, sleep disorders and social stigmatization.

The study, titled “Ethnic Minority Children's Active Commuting to School and Association with Physical Activity and Pedestrian Safety Behavior,” was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through its national program Active Living Research.

 


STORY TAGS: BLACK , AFRICAN AMERICAN , MINORITY , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , NAACP , URBAN LEAGUE , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY, HISPANIC , LATINO , MEXICAN , MINORITY , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , DIVERSITY , LATINA , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News