Today's Date: September 23, 2021
Fiverr Announces Inaugural Future Collective, a Business Accelerator Fellowship for Black Entrepreneurs   •   African-American History Courses Available at No Cost to High School Students in Florida and Texas for the 2021-2022 School Year   •   Women’s Entrepreneurship Accelerator Celebrates Second Anniversary by Announcing Impactful Initiatives to Drive Change for   •   New American Funding Recognized as a Best Workplaces for Women by Fortune and Great Place to Work   •   Toward One Wisconsin Conference on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Taking Place Oct. 12-13   •   Equable Institute Analysis Estimates U.S. Statewide Pension Funding Shortfall to Shrink by $400 Billion in 2021   •   Data Shows Almost Half of All Child Car Seats Are Misused   •   American Eagle Outfitters, Inc. Launches AE77, an Artfully Designed and Sustainably Crafted Premium Denim Brand   •   Angela Moy of Fareva Wins 2021 Women in Supply Chain Award for Sourcing Excellence   •   Cloudera Shines Educational Spotlight on Data and AI with Children's Book for 8- to 12-year-olds   •   BMO's 17th Annual Equity Through Education Trading Day Raises C$1.6 Million to Promote Diversity, Equity and Inclusion   •   Athliance, Leading NCAA NIL Compliance & Protection Software, Launches “PlayItSafe” Brand Consulting Service   •   Chamberlain Group and Comer Children's Hospital Unveil Innovative STEAM-based Therapeutic Intervention   •   Ecoriginals Brings World's Greenest Diapers and Wipes Stateside With U.S. Expansion   •   Raise Breast Cancer Awareness at Ladies Night Out Events at ImageCare Radiology’s New Locations   •   Cochlear Foundation launches global partnership with Malala Fund to remove hearing loss as a barrier to education   •   Picture Gets Brighter for Underrepresented Filmmakers   •   DKT International Implements Traditional and New Forms of Marketing in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia to Expand Acces   •   L.O.L. Surprise!™ Is Going Hollywood This Holiday Season   •   Financial Wellbeing Benefits Provider Salary Finance Launches Podcast, “Working on Wellbeing”
Bookmark and Share

Native American Parents Extend Drinking Habits To Children

FORT COLLINS - Urban American Indian teenagers with alcoholic parents perceive their parents to be less restrictive about drinking and tend to face more alcohol-related problems at age 18, according to a new study by Colorado State University’s Tri-Ethnic Center. The study recently was published in the The American Journal on Addictions, a peer-reviewed journal.

Native American News, Indian News, Native News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, EqualityThe Tri-Ethnic Center has spent the past 35 years studying the epidemiology of drug abuse on Indian reservations, but this is the first study of its kind that evaluates young American Indians in an urban setting. The study tracked teens from age 13 through 18.

Authors of the research include Randall Swaim and Fred Beauvais, senior research scientists in Colorado State’s Department of Psychology, and Dale and Patricia Silk-Walker, professors in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Sciences University. The project was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

The researchers interviewed teens and their parents or caregivers in 251 households over the six-year period. Generally, they found that parental norms against alcohol reduce levels of use at younger ages. More important, the researchers established that urban Indian youth are not unique among their peers when it comes to perceived parental norms and alcohol-related problems at age 18.

American Indian men are 50 percent more likely to experience alcohol dependence compared with other men, according to a national survey. Other studies reveal that alcohol and other drug use are among three leading causes of death among American Indian youth, with alcohol dependence the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric condition.

“When you have a parent diagnosed with alcoholism, we know there’s some genetic influence of alcoholism that increases your chances, but you also have the social influence of the parent,” Swaim said. “You have a double whammy.”

The authors suggest that American Indian families should continue to be involved in alcohol-use prevention discussions as long as possible – even after schools begin to get involved in drug education – to ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality among Indian youth.

Key findings of the study:
• Youth with one or two parents diagnosed with alcohol abuse/dependence were less likely to perceive family norms against alcohol use.
• Youth with two parents diagnosed were more likely to report alcohol-related problems at age 18.
• Higher rates of perceived family norms against alcohol use protected youth from high rates of use at age 13, but higher rates of alcohol use at age 13 predicted more alcohol-related problems at age 18.

Read Full Report Here


STORY TAGS: Native American News, Indian News, Native News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News