November 29, 2020         
DISH Network Puts Consumers at Risk of Losing Network and Local Community Programming During Pandemic   •   “KISS THE GROUND” Wins Its 25th Film Festival Award to Date   •   Majority of Americans Expect to Buy Gifts This Holiday Season Despite Tumultuous Year, but Many Cut From the Gift List According   •   Enough is Enough: Ontario Engineering Community Committed to Uprooting Systematic Biases   •   realme's 50M Sales Achievement Attracts Positive Comments From Industry Leaders Anticipating Its Future   •   Because Apes Are Hairy Too, MANSCAPED™ Supports the San Diego Zoo!   •   COVID-19 Recovery Research Program launched   •   Ismael Cala launches CalaBienestar.news, a daily digital newspaper about health and wellbeing   •   COVID-19 Can Be Beat - Please Don't Shut Down All Youth Activities Indiscriminately   •   Vehicle Retail Sales Decline due to Quirky Sales Calendar; When Adjusted for Selling Days, Retail Sales Stable   •   Afiya Bennett Makes Stunning Appearance in L'officiel Brasil in Honor of Black Awareness Day in Brasil   •   Satmar Cancels Grand Annual Dinner   •   Comcast RISE Awards Over 700 Black-Owned, Small Businesses with Marketing and Technology Resources and Makeovers   •   Hall of Fame Resort & Entertainment Company Reveals Details of Hall Of Trivia on HQ App   •   Michaels is Calling On #DifferenceMakers to Creatively Spread Holiday Cheer   •   More support to advance reform of services for Indigenous children and families   •   Government of Canada COVID-19 Update for Indigenous Peoples and communities   •   Jamaican Boy's Post-Dog Attack Procedures Highlight the Less Well-Known Side of a Plastic Surgeon's Work, says Dr. J Plastic Sur   •   iHeartMedia and Podimo Partner to Translate and Adapt Widely Popular Podcasts For Listeners Globally   •   Advancing Equity, Improving Lives: Minister Bardish Chagger Launches LGBTQ2 Survey and Engagement on Federal LGBTQ2 Action Plan
Bookmark and Share

New Cancer Screening For Minority Women Intro'd

 NEW YORK — Minority patients have a significantly decreased survival from colon cancer compared to white patients, most often as a result of a late diagnosis. To help address this problem, a team of healthcare professionals at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center has identified an efficient way to increase minority access to lifesaving colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) in communities where multiple barriers to preventive care exist. In the November 8 issue of the journalCancer, the group reports how women living in Harlem were introduced to CRCS during their routine mammography screening.

“We hypothesized that mammography centers, similar to the one where this study took place, offer a unique opportunity to introduce the concept of colon cancer screening, because the women being tested are most likely already familiar with the concept of cancer screening,” explained Moshe Shike, MD, an attending physician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the study’s lead author. “Unfortunately, minorities in this community often have a late diagnosis and subsequent poor outcome from colon cancer because they are not able to – for one reason or another – access the routine preventive care they need. However, minority women, including many living in Harlem, are taking advantage of mammography screening as a result of ongoing outreach and education efforts.”

In Harlem, Manhattan’s northernmost community, the survival rate for colorectal cancer – the nation’s second leading cause of cancer mortality – is low. Research has identified several contributing factors to the late diagnosis and lack of screening in this community, including little or no medical insurance, language barriers, distrust of the medical community at large, and under-representation in the healthcare system. But as health reform moves forward, and a stronger emphasis is placed on preventive care, communities around the country will need to find ways to facilitate the screening process, as well as find ways to fund it, notes Dr. Shike.

The teams’ study took place at the Breast Examination Center of Harlem (BECH) — a community outreach program of Memorial Sloan-Kettering that offers free, high-quality care, including cervical and breast cancer screening to primarily African-American and Hispanic women. Women aged 50 years or older who had not undergone colon cancer screening in the past ten years were eligible to participate. (Eligibility was also based on patients not having serious illnesses such as heart or lung disease or uncontrolled diabetes.) Following the patients’ mammography, eligible women met with bilingual staff to learn about the screening process and ascertain whether they were eligible to undergo colonoscopy. This process, Dr. Shike pointed out, can be effective and reduce costs because women can be referred, medically screened, and prepared without having to obtain a referral from another physician.

"We rode the coattails of an already successful, preexisting screening program model and showed that by introducing colon cancer screening at this time, we were able to facilitate the process and expand access,” explained Dr. Shike. “This is important because many women coming to facilities like BECH have little or no health insurance, and many do not see a primary care physician regularly. We were able to remove the burden of having to obtain a referral, which in many cases leads to patients not getting the screening they need.”

Of 2,616 eligible women, 611 patients initially gave their consent. Although fewer than 25 percent of those eligible joined the study, the researchers point out that the lack of involvement was not for lack of interest. “Only a small percentage cited a lack of interest for declining screening,” noted Dr. Shike. “Once the eligible patients were sitting face-to-face with a healthcare provider, the majority of women were engaged in the discussion.”

“Our colonoscopy findings in this study are similar to those in the general population, so offering colon cancer screening to underserved, minority women at the time of mammography, without a doctor’s referral, is an effective way to expand screening,” said Dr. Shike, who notes that alternatives to traditional medical insurance continue to be a barrier to access for the uninsured.


Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is the world’s oldest and largest private institution devoted to prevention, patient care, research, and education in cancer. Our scientists and clinicians generate innovative approaches to better understand, diagnose, and treat cancer. These specialists are leaders in biomedical research and in translating the latest research to advance the standard of cancer care worldwide.


STORY TAGS: BLACK , AFRICAN AMERICAN , MINORITY , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , NAACP , URBAN LEAGUE , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY, WOMEN , MINORITY , DISCRIMINATION , DIVERSITY , FEMALE , UNDERREPRESENTED , EQUALITY , GENDER BIAS , EQUALITY



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News