Today's Date: May 7, 2021
First Command Reports: Financial Readiness Slipping in Career Military Families   •   /DISREGARD RELEASE: Chad Cooper Company/   •   Pampers Launches “Million Acts of Love” Initiative To Inspire & Remind Parents Of Their Infinite Capacity For Lo   •   Mednax Reports First Quarter Results   •   e.l.f. Cosmetics Changing the Game and Empowering Others on Twitch   •   Secret Deodorant and Sportsnet Partner to Deliver Exclusive Coverage of PWHPA’s Secret Dream Gap Tour in Canada   •   Suburban Propane Provides Catered Mother's Day Celebration + Stocks the Pantry at Abby's House   •   Getting Handsy With Yourself: Psychologist and Sex Therapist, Dr. Kate Balestrieri, Talks Self-Love This National Masturbation M   •   The Workplace is Changing: Thomas Friedman Predicts Seismic Shifts Will Offer Opportunities for Women Who Have Left the Workforc   •   New Research Reveals Disconnect Between Increased Stress and Lower Behavioral Health Diagnoses Rates in Georgia   •   Kanal D Drama Premieres "La Trampa Del Amor" For The U.S. Hispanic Audience   •   National PTA Relaunches Family Reading Experience Program   •   Revolve Group Announces First Quarter 2021 Financial Results   •   Pappas teams up with Candace Jordan and Luxe Bloom on Mother's Day   •   Merck, illycaffè, REI Co-op and AMN Healthcare CEO Susan Salka Named 2021 Visionary Award Honorees by Women Corporate Dir   •   SBI ALApharma Canada Inc., a Subsidiary of photonamic GmbH & Co. KG (Germany), Enrolls First Patient in Pivotal Phase 3 Clin   •   Star Staffing Awarded Forbes 2021 Best Recruiting and Temporary Staffing Firm for Second Year   •   Cincinnati Children's Breaks Ground on New Behavioral Health Facility   •   Salary Finance Survey Reveals Harsh Reality of Financial Hardships Facing Vulnerable Populations   •   Young Visionaries Celebrates 20 Years of Service in the Inland Empire
Bookmark and Share

New Drugs Encouraging For Blacks Hepatitis C Patients

HOUSTON — Two new drugs just approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat hepatitis C genotype 1 significantly improved the cure rates of patients. One of the drugs was extremely effective in treating African Americans.

The current standard of treatment of interferon and ribavirun has only been effective in curing 38 to 40 percent of patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1. In clinical trials, Victrelis and Incivek, when working in concert with interferon and ribavirun, cured 65 to 75 percent of people with chronic disease and Victrelis-alone doubled the previous cure rate among African Americans. 

“African Americans represent a patient population that typically does not respond well to standard therapy,” said Dr. Howard Monsour, chief of Hepatology at The Methodist Hospital in Houston and one of the physicians involved in the clinical trials. “Victrelis has helped boost the cure rate from 23 percent to 53 percent, which is extremely encouraging.”

Monsour believes the recent approval of both drugs represents the most significant news in the fight against hepatitis C in a decade.

Hepatitis C is a viral infection that leads to inflammation of the liver. IV drug use is the most common cause and it affects nearly two percent of the U.S. population. Some 80 percent of people with hepatitis C develop chronic disease and between 20 and 50 percent will develop cirrhosis of the liver.

Victrelis and Incivek work effectively by attacking the virus directly and interfering with the virus’ ability to replicate. They are only effective against a genotype 1 infection, which is most common form of hepatitis C in the United States.

The clinical trials studied three classes of patients: 1) Patients who had never been treated. 2) Patients who had been treated, lost the virus, but had a relapse once the medication stopped. 3) Patients who responded poorly to treatment without the loss of the virus.

“We found a 65 to 75 percent cure rate in both the people who had never been treated and in those who had a relapse and in the third group we found up to a 55 percent cure rate,” Monsour said. “The drugs have also shortened the treatment time from a year to, in most cases, six to eight months, and with many other drugs in development, the future looks very bright.”


STORY TAGS: Hepatitis CBlack News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News