Today's Date: January 23, 2021
RBB Bancorp Declares Quarterly Cash Dividend of $0.12 Per Share   •   100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc. Honors the Legacy of Member and Baseball Hall of Famer Henry "Hank" Aaron   •   8 Women in Sustainability to Know in 2021   •   Ric Edelman Shares the Investment Strategy You Need Now That the Election is Over   •   ddm marketing + communications Publishes Whitepaper On Integrating Media And Content Strategies   •   The Estée Lauder Companies to Webcast Discussion of Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Results on February 5, 2021   •   National Federation of the Blind Applauds the Introduction of the Access Technology Affordability Act in the House   •   DoorDash Announces New Brand Campaign That Spotlights Expanded Offerings Beyond Food and Celebrates Local Communities   •   Luxury Card Announces New Partnership With AMOREPACIFIC in the US   •   1 Habit Press Releases the Ultimate Play Book for Life - 1 Habit to Thrive in a Post-Covid World   •   8 Women to Know in Sustainability in 2021   •   100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc. Honors the Legacy of Member and Baseball Hall of Famer Henry "Hank" Aaron   •   Curtsy Raises $11M To Scale Clothing Resell App for Gen Z   •   Disney Announces Digital Summit Inspired by Minnie Mouse in Celebration of National Polka Dot Day   •   Status of Women Ministers Endorse Declaration for a Canada Free of Gender-Based Violence   •   Richard Patterson former Tesla designer of the Model S makes history as the first black manufacturer and designer of a Supercar   •   Seven Dow leaders achieve top honors on OUTstanding’s 2020 leading LGBT+ professionals lists   •   Hope Hospice Uses Animatronic Pets in Dementia Care   •   Krylon® Brand Blends Natural Elements and Virtual Escapes with 2021 Spray Paint Color Palette   •   Athleta Adds Extended Sizing to 350 Styles in Its 200 Stores and Online
Bookmark and Share

New Jersey Blacks Less Likely To Survive Cancer Than Whites

 

 

 

Newswise — A New Jersey study found that African-Americans with cancer are less likely to survive it than whites, and residents of poor neighborhoods less likely to survive than are those in wealthier areas of the state.

The racial disadvantage diminishes when socioeconomic status is a consideration, but does not disappear, according to the study in the February issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

“Our results are not surprising,” said Xiaoling Niu, a biostatistician at Cancer Epidemiology Services in the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, and lead study author. “Other studies have also revealed poorer survival rates among blacks.” Few, however, relied on such a wealth of data on such a diverse population, she said.

The data come from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry, which records nearly all cases among the 8.6 million residents of the state. The authors looked at cases diagnosed from 1986 to 1999 and analyzed survival rates for breast cancer in women; prostate, colorectal and lung cancer; and all cancers combined.

Having cancer and being black or living in a poorer neighborhood meant higher risk of death, even when researchers adjusted for age and cancer stage at diagnosis. “Disparities occur amid relative poverty as well as absolute poverty,” the authors wrote.

Other minorities fared better than African-Americans: Cancer survival among Hispanics was the same as for whites; among Asians and Pacific Islanders, it was better.

Taken alone, these data cannot explain the observed racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities, but “this kind of study can provide background information for more targeted research into underlying behavioral and social factors,” Niu said.

Study co-author Karen Pawlish, an epidemiologist, said, “diet, obesity, physical activity and smoking may affect survival. Biological factors could explain part of the difference, but there may be other factors related to access and quality of care.”

Brian Smedley, vice president and director of the Health Policy Institute at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, said that “separate but unequal” health care services probably are involved.

“We know that minorities are disproportionately clustered in medically underserved communities, where many health care institutions have fewer resources to provide high-quality care,” Smedley said. “Research increasingly points to differences in care that patients of color receive compared to whites. Some have called this ‘medical apartheid.’”

The N.J. study “raises more questions than it answers,” Smedley said. “I’d like to see research move away from describing the problem to looking at interventions that level the playing field.”

 

 

Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved: Contact Editor Virginia M. Brennan at (615) 327-6819 orvbrennan@mmc.edu. Online, visithttp://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_health_care_for_the_poor_and_underserved/

Niu X, Pawlish KS, Roche LM. Cancer survival disparities by race/ethnicity and

socioeconomic status in New Jersey. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 21(1), 2010. 


Source: Health Behavior News Service


STORY TAGS: black, african, american, new jersey, nj, cancer, diagnosis, prognosis, concerns, concern, risk, minority, cancer, illness, treatment, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, black radio network, black, cancer, minority news, minority health



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
Breaking News
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News