August 4, 2020         
The Home Depot to Host Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call on August 18   •   Canada Goose Announces First Quarter 2021 Earnings Release Date, Conference Call and Webcast   •   Citizens Bank Announces Grant Program for Minority-Owned Small Businesses   •   Southern California Non-Profit Mourns The Death Of Two Beloved Board Members, Peter Devereaux and Bryan Stockton   •   TeamDynamix Receives Three Top Rankings from Comparably 2020 Awards: Best CEO for Women, Best Leadership Team and Best Professio   •   Two Original European Crime-Solving Drama TV Series Premiere This Summer On Ultra Macho   •   Newman's Own Gives $1 Million to Virtual Camp for Children with Serious Illnesses   •   NewRez Senior Vice President, Debbie Knotts, Receives HousingWire’s Women of Influence Award   •   COVID-19 putting millions of girls at risk of never returning to school   •   NIH Awards $2.3 Million to The Lundquist Institute to Study the Impact of Vaping While Pregnant   •   GSBA And Comcast Washington Launch Ready for Business Fund to Support Small Businesses   •   Marler Clark, the Salmonella Lawyers, file the first Red Onion Salmonella Lawsuit against Thomson International   •   Joni Wolfswinkel, CEO of Houston's Real Property Management Preferred Awarded as One of HousingWire Magazine's 2020 Women of Inf   •   Ramsey Press Begins Presale of Book Know Yourself, Know Your Money by Two-time #1 National Best-selling Author Rachel Cruze   •   Eye Level Literary Award 2020 for Aspiring Young Authors Goes Online   •   Superior HealthPlan Encourages Early Childhood Vaccinations During National Immunization Awareness Month   •   Coalition Continues to Grow in Opposition to California's Proposed Menthol Cigarette Ban   •   Stellar Cyber’s Aimei Wei Named One of the Top 100 Women in Cybersecurity for 2020   •   RTW Retailwinds, Inc. Announces Execution of Asset Purchase Agreement with Sunrise Brands, LLC for the Sale of its e-Commerce Bu   •   Nextt Launches Healthcare Supplies Division to Provide Medical Grade PPE Products During Pandemic
Bookmark and Share

New La Raza Report: States Could Miss Out On Rare Chance To Improve Early Education For Latino Children

 

 

 

Washington, DC—Preliminary findings indicate that states are lagging woefully behind in taking advantage of opportunities to better serve diverse student populations, particularly Latinos and English language learners (ELLs), according to a report released today by NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States. The report,Responding to the Needs of Young Latino Children: State Efforts to Build Comprehensive Early Learning Systems, outlines unprecedented developments in U.S. policies and federal funding that would help states improve their early childhood education programs.

Last year marked a great investment in early childhood education programs, amounting to more than $4 billion in federal funding. If approved by Congress, the Early Learning Challenge Fund would provide another $8 billion throughout the next eight years toward competitive grants for states to improve the quality of their birth-to-five programs. These improvements would affect Early Head Start, Head Start, and preschool programs, programs in which Latino children are underrepresented or not well served.

“Hispanic children make up nearly a quarter of the child population in the country and are the fastest-growing group of children, yet Latino families have the least access to high-quality early childhood education,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “We have an opportunity here to invest in all of our kids at the earliest age, when it can make a real difference in closing the horrendous achievement gap we see in high school and beyond.”

The report notes that of the eight states where interviews were conducted with members of state Early Childhood Advisory Councils, researchers, and state agency leaders—all of which have high Latino populations—most have few benchmarks to measure success for ELL students.

One exception and model for other states is California, where the state’s Department of Education, urged by ELL advocates, defined guidelines designed to “assist classroom teachers in their understanding of children’s progress toward English-language proficiency.” Few states, however, have had resources to address this issue and little will to design culturally competent professional development systems. When standards have been developed, they were done with little Latino involvement.

NCLR made the following recommendations in the report: Congress must support the development of better measures to identify ELL students, require states to develop learning benchmarks for these students, require mechanisms for recruiting and training culturally and linguistically diverse professional staff, and require the inclusion of ELL experts in the creation of standards, among other fixes.

“We cannot miss this important opportunity to transform early education programs,” Murguía said. “States must work to develop early learning programs that take into account the needs of all children, including English language learners.”

For more information, visit www.nclr.org | http://www.facebook.com/nationalcounciloflaraza |http://www.myspace.com/nclr2008 | http://twitter.com/nclr.

 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News