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NY State Population Holds Steady

NEW YORK - Confirming a minor increase in population in New York over the last decade, U.S. Census 2010 population data released today shows that downstate and suburban counties continue to demonstrate growth – especially in minority communities – while Upstate and rural areas, in particular, continue to struggle with population decline.

 

The 2010 data indicates that of the State Senate’s 62 districts, 27 are underpopulated  based on the new district population mean of 312,550.

   

Questions remain, however, regarding the accuracy of figures for the New York City-metro area which may significantly undercount real population increases across the five boroughs and neighboring counties. In Queens for instance, the Census reported a mere increase of 1,343 bringing the county’s total to 2,230,722.

 

Senate Democratic Leader John L. Sampson said, “Census figures have a direct impact on the services we guarantee all New Yorkers – any undercount in our state’s population could seriously jeopardize much-needed federal funding for schools, hospitals and transportation , among other vital services. Meanwhile in Upstate, the population decline underscores the need for a comprehensive economic development plan to stimulate job growth. This data reminds us that redistricting must be done fairly, and utilize accurate numbers. Albany must keep its promise to enact an independent redistricting plan, and the U.S. Census must keep its promise to deliver fair and accurate data for New York’s future.”

 

Next week, Senator Sampson will name members to a new task force to ensure the Conference’s commitment to redistricting reform is followed through despite objections to reform from the current Senate Majority. The task force will undertake a statewide public outreach campaign to educate New Yorkers about the redistricting process and help facilitate public participation in the process through public hearings, forums, and new access to population records.

 

Senator Martin Malavé Dilan, a member of the Legislative Task Force on Demographic and Reapportionment said, “As we move forward with redistricting it is of the utmost importance that the process and ultimate outcome remain rooted in the numbers we received today. The further we deviate from this data for political reasons, the more we erode the principle of one person, one vote.”

 

Among some of the most notable shifts in population include:

·         Since 2000, New York's population grew by 2.1 percent, from 18.9 million in 2000 to 19,378,102  in 2010.

·         New York City’s population increased by 2.1 percent, from $8 million in 2000 to 8,175,133 in 2010.

·         Four out of Five Upstate cities lost population, including: Buffalo, Yonkers, Rochester and Syracuse.

·         Hispanic and Asian New Yorkers are among the state’s fastest growing populations.

 

Population Growth by Race:

·         Hispanic population grew at a rate of 19.2 percent.

·         African-American population grew at a rate of 2 percent.

·         Asian population grew at a rate of 35.9 percent.

·         White population decreased by 1.2 percent.



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