Today's Date: May 16, 2021
MetroPlusHealth to Host Virtual Town Hall: Stand Up Against Anti-Asian Hate   •   BREAKING NEWS: CAIR Joins Boycott of White House Eid Celebration in Response to Biden Administration's Defense of Israeli Attack   •   Save the Galaxy in the Epic Saga of Commander Shepard With Mass Effect Legendary Edition Today   •   The Race Epidemic Documentary Featuring CA Attorney General Rob Bonta, Former Treasurer John Chiang, Congressmember Judy Chu Pre   •   Clark Atlanta University Partners With the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP) To Launch $1 Million Partners   •   Young Women with Chest Pain Wait Longer and Receive Less Urgent Care Than Men   •   Optime Care Calls for Greater Awareness of Hereditary Angioedema, Highlights Patient-First Strategy for Treatment and Optimized   •   Pyxus International, Inc. Announces Date of 2021 Annual Meeting   •   ScholarShare 529 to Offer Families College Savings Stimulus for 529 Day   •   After 59 Years, the Families of Flying Tiger Line Flight 739 Receive Closure   •   Mastercard and National Women’s Soccer League Announce Multi-Year Partnership Centered on Elevating Visibility for the Spo   •   RYB Education, Inc. Files Its Annual Report on Form 20-F   •   California Family Physicians Applaud Expansion of COVID-19 Vaccine to Adolescents   •   Grand Council Treaty #3, Canada and Ontario sign a Memorandum of Understanding to improve education for First Nations students   •   Pole for Grosjean, Honda at GMR Grand Prix of Indianapolis   •   Scott’s Liquid Gold-Inc. Reports First Quarter Results   •   KB Home Announces the Grand Opening of Hudson Grove, a New-Home Community in North Jacksonville, Priced from the $270,000s   •   Mental Health in Focus: Healthline Announces Next Live Town Hall   •   Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits Hosts Education Panel in Support of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Mont   •   IndyCar Drivers Take Flight at LIFT Academy
Bookmark and Share

On The Job Activity Good For Hispanics

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- It may seem intuitive that greater amounts of exercise lead to less obesity, but an Indiana University study has found that this conventional wisdom applies primarily to white women. The findings draw attention not only to racial, ethnic and gender differences regarding exercise but also to the role work can play.

In his study involving more than 12,000 people in a nationally representative sample of U.S 20- to 64-year-olds, obesity expert Dong-Chul Seo found that obesity rates in general declined as the amount of weekly leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) increased. White women, however, saw the steepest decreases, particularly when meeting minimum national guidelines for weekly physical activity. This was not always the case for men and for women who were African American or Hispanic.

"For the majority of health professionals, even health researchers, they say the more leisure-time physical activity you engage in, the less likely you'll get obese," said Seo, associate professor in the School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation's Department of Applied Health Science. "This is true, but it's probably only applicable to white women and some of the white men."

Surprised by the results, Seo looked deeper and found that job-related physical activity might have influenced obesity rates. Studies have found, for example, that men and Hispanic women are more likely to have manually demanding jobs than white women, which could affect the amount of LTPA they accumulate. For Hispanic women, their obesity rates dropped as their amount of occupational physical activity (OPA) increased. However, a different pattern was seen for men.

"This illustrates to me the importance of physical activity in the workplace," Seo said. "Workplace wellness programs should really be emphasized, especially for people who do sedentary work. To enhance their health, maybe employers could offer workout spaces and incentives to do physical activity during the work hours or right after. They can make it easier."

The study, published in the May issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, is the first study that shows population-based evidence of a graded dose response relationship between the total volume of LTPA and obesity.

For a copy of the study, contact Tracy James at traljame@indiana.edu or 812-855-0084. Here are more findings and information about the study:

A body mass index of 30 or higher was considered obese. The age-adjusted rates of obesity were calculated according to six categories based on minimum national guidelines for physical activity: The obesity rate for women was 41.4 percent for those with no LTPA in the past month, 39.1 percent for those who engaged in LTPA but fell short of minimum national guidelines, 31 percent for those who met the minimum guidelines, 28 percent for those who exceeded the minimum guidelines but were within the first quartile of overachievers, 23.4 percent for the overachievers between the first and third quartile, and 19.5 percent for the overachievers at or above the third quartile.

When this obesity rate is considered for women who are white, Hispanic and African American, the percentages are 40.6 percent, 41.5 percent and 51 percent, respectively, for those with no LTPA; 37.5 percent, 45.4 percent and 55.4 percent for those who engaged in LTPA but fell short of minimum national guidelines; 27.7 percent, 34.5 percent and 50 percent for those who met minimum guidelines; 26 percent, 33.8 percent and 44.5 percent for those who exceeded the minimum guidelines but were within the first quartile of overachievers; 16.5 percent, 38.5 percent and 46 percent for the overachievers between the first and third quartile; and 14, 41.6 and 38.1 percent for the overachievers at or above the third quartile.

The age-adjusted rates of obesity for men were 31.4 percent for those with no LTPA in the past month, 29.5 percent for those who engaged in LTPA but fell short of minimum national guidelines, 29.8 percent for those who met the minimum guidelines, 27.9 percent for those who exceeded the minimum guidelines but were within the first quartile of overachievers, 26.7 percent for the overachievers between the first and third quartile, and 26.9 percent for the overachievers at or above the third quartile.
The study sample of 12,227 people was drawn from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999 to 2006. NHANES data is unique in that study participants are physically measured for height and weight rather than relying on self reports. The data also includes metabolic equivalents (MET) for study participants' leisure-time physical activity.

National guidelines call for a minimum of 450-750 MET minutes per week. MET is a way of quantifying the total amount of physical activity in a way that is comparable across various forms of physical activity. Walking briskly for 30 minutes, for example, is around 100 MET. Running 6 mph for 30 minutes is around 300 MET.

Seo said the biggest decline in obesity rates was seen between women who met the guidelines and those who participated in LTPA but fell short of the guidelines. He said this supports the effectiveness of the minimum guidelines at least in terms of weight control -- and it was only applicable to women.


530 E. Kirkwood Ave.
Suite 203
Bloomington, IN
47408-4003
Email:iuinfo@indiana.edu 
Web:http://newsinfo.iu.edu


Media Contacts

Tracy James
University Communications
traljame@indiana.edu
812-855-0084



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News