Today's Date: February 26, 2024
The Cymbiotika San Diego Open   •   Dominion Energy and the Library of Virginia Honor Four Leaders as 'Strong Men & Women in Virginia History'   •   Amway Honors ‘Heroes’ for Significant Contributions to Community and Country   •   Avangrid Hosts Federal Leadership at New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal   •   ANDREA LA'VERNE EDNEY SWORN IN AS FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMAN NATIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF TRIAL ADVOCATES   •   City of Hope Launches First-of-its-Kind Mobile Cancer Prevention and Screening Program   •   Experienced Legal and Computer Engineering Expert Jennifer Davis Brings Important Perspectives to Scrum Alliance® Board of D   •   The Economist Group appoints Luke Bradley-Jones President, The Economist   •   Crowe and Intuit QuickBooks collaborate on new program to enable minority-owned small business growth   •   Arizona Athletic Grounds draws over 100,000 Attendees for Presidents Weekend   •   Florida SouthWestern State College Selects YuJa Panorama Digital Accessibility Platform to Replace Former Accessibility Product   •   Avangrid’s Customer Experience and Digital Center of Excellence Leading the Way   •   Supergoop! Appoints Beauty Industry Veteran Lisa Sequino as CEO to Lead Next Chapter of Growth   •   Big Blue Marble Academy in Mauldin Expands to New Location to Serve More Families in the Community   •   FOUR SEASONS RESORT MAUI CELEBRATES SPRING BREAK WITH NEW SEASONAL EXPERIENCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUNG TRAVELERS FROM MARCH 10 -   •   Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute Announces Alumni Association South Florida Chapter   •   Watercrest St. Lucie West Assisted Living and Memory Care Honored with Prestigious Reputation 800 Award   •   Curative Names Ellen Sexton New Chief Operating Officer   •   Calvert Research and Management announces 100 Most Sustainable U.S. Companies   •   Greenlight and Tropical Smoothie Cafe Join Forces to Reward Kids and Teens for Learning About the World of Money
Bookmark and Share

Preschool Support Critical For Latino Voters

 New America Media, News Report, Vivian Po,

SAN FRANCISCO - California Latinos of every political affiliation are much more likely to vote for candidates this November who support early childhood education, according to a new statewide poll. 

The bipartisan survey of 895 registered Latino voters was conducted by Hart Research Associates and The Tarrance Group on behalf of Univision and Preschool California, a nonprofit organization that advocates for high-quality early education for all California children. 

The results of the poll, which was conducted in English and Spanish, were released Wednesday at a teleconference with ethnic media. 

Nearly seven in 10 Latino voters (69 percent) said they were more likely to support candidates for governor or the state legislature who wanted to increase funding to make preschool and early learning more accessible and affordable. 

Some 61 percent of respondents said they would be less likely to vote for candidates who favored cuts in preschool funding.

One-fifth of registered voters in California are Latino.

Meanwhile, Latinos account for half of all children under age 5. By 2025, they will make up more than half of the state’s labor force.

The new poll shows that as a voting issue, preschool funding “is really going to make a difference,” according to Mark Bunge, a vice president with Hart Research.

“What it means for candidates who want to be successful is they must understand Latino voters’ needs and their priorities,” Bunge asserted. “And the poll tells us that education is a top priority for Latino voters.”

In the poll, 75 percent of Latino voters said that candidates who will work to give children the opportunity to get a great education appeal to them “a great deal”—even more so than candidates who will look out for Latino families or invest in infrastructure.

More than 90 percent of respondents agreed that California needs to continue to support high-quality preschool programs to prepare children for success in kindergarten and beyond, even though the state’s economy and budget are in bad shape. 

Ernesto Saldaña, Preschool California’s statewide field director, said he believed the strong reaction was rooted in the Latino community’s dissatisfaction with the state’s failure to provide early education opportunities for their children. 

“Latino children are the least likely to be enrolled in any kind of early learning programs,” Saldaña said. Only about 14 percent of Latino children are currently enrolled in a high-quality preschool that prepares them for elementary school, he said.

Seventy-two percent of Latino voters said they believed that no more than half of families in their communities have access to high-quality preschool, either because programs aren’t affordable or because half-day programs do not fit the needs of working parents. 

Although Latino families have limited access to early education, the poll shows that Latino voters think highly of those programs. Some 85 percent of respondents said children who attend preschool have advantages over those who do not; the reasons they gave include a belief that children are more receptive and eager to learn before the age of 5 and that the preschool environment can help kids develop social, problem-solving and learning skills.

The poll was conducted in July. Hart Research is a Democratic pollster. The Tarrance Group works on behalf of Republican candidates.



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News