Today's Date: October 24, 2021
Smokeball Ushers in Its Fourth-Annual Season of Giving   •   Empowering Leadership in Latina Athletes (ELLA) Prepares Young Female Athletes for Success   •   Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles Honors Michael E. Kassan, Stacy Green and The Los Angeles Rams Raising Over $1,0   •   Aleada Consulting Accepted Into Forbes Technology Council   •   Transformative Justice Coalition (TJC) Press Conference and March: "Justice And the First Amendment "   •   Foxy P's 2021 African Princes Of Comedy Tour Ramps For Tomorrow Night In The City Of Brotherly Love   •   Groupon Announces Date of Third Quarter 2021 Earnings Release and Conference Call   •   Polaris Healthcare announces its newest member, The Sentinel of Rockland, an assisted living community   •   Utz Brands to Report Third Quarter 2021 Financial Results on November 11, 2021   •   Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas partners with Candace Jordan and Black Men United in a North Michigan Avenue random act of ki   •   Ángela Aguilar And Manzanita Sol Join Forces To Give Back To Los Angeles Community For Día De Los Muertos   •   Walgreens Now Offering Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots Nationwide   •   Macy’s, Inc. Board of Directors Declares Quarterly Dividend   •   Apostle Crystal Moore Naylor is being recognized by Continental Who's Who   •   Netcapital Advisors’ Upcoming Women in Private Equity Webinar Series to Feature Keynote Speaker Gloria Feldt on the Topic   •   Aramark Celebrates LGBTQ+ Pride by Naming Mark Wallace the 2021 Ian Bailey Pride of Aramark Award Recipient   •   Navy vs UC Face-Off to Start with Patriotic Team Fastrax Skydive   •   Closing Achievement Gaps for African American Young Men in San Francisco   •   Korean War Naval Aviator Reunites With His Combat Fighter Plane   •   Redbox to Ring the NASDAQ Stock Market Opening Bell
Bookmark and Share

Psychologist Aims To Reduce Risky Sexual Behavior Among African American Girls

Developing and evaluating a faith-based, HIV-prevention program for African-American mothers and their daughters is the focus of Dr. Chisina Kapungu's $795,000 career development grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Kapungu, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, is a clinical psychologist who has worked on HIV prevention programs, conducted research on the multi-systemic factors of HIV risk in African-American adolescents, and counseled HIV-infected women and kids.

Her proposed research project will work with two Chicago churches to pilot a faith-based HIV prevention program for community-based educators to administer to women and their daughters, ages 13 to 16.

The project, while still in the development stage, is "going to be very collaborative, very much based on principles of community-based participatory research, with shared decision-making throughout the process," said Kapungu, who developed the project while completing a post-doctoral fellowship at UIC's Institute for Health Research and Policy.

The intervention is based on two existing HIV prevention programs -- one developed by the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice in Washington, and the other an evidenced-based program, Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering, recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and proven effective among African-American women and girls.

Kapungu plans to integrate the two programs and customize the curriculum based on the needs of the community, to include information about parental monitoring, assertive communication, and negotiating safe sexual practices.

"The goal of the intervention is to decrease sexual possibility situations and delay the onset of sexual debut," said Kapungu, who describes the intervention as not focused on condom usage.

Research has shown that family factors such as parental monitoring, communication, and parental attachment are associated with delays in sexual intercourse among adolescents, Kapungu said. "There really hasn't been empirical work in implementing faith- and family-based HIV interventions."

Although African Americans are 13 percent of the U.S. population, they experience 59 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in the country, according to the CDC.

"The church has been an untapped resource within the HIV prevention field and can have a potentially important role in educating young people about sexuality and HIV," Kapungu said. "Worldwide, faith-based organizations have focused on secondary prevention, counseling and support for infected individuals and peer education groups, but less on primary prevention."

A photograph of Kapungu is available atnewsphoto.lib.uic.edu/v/kapungu/.

UIC ranks among the nation's leading research universities and is Chicago's largest university with 26,000 students, 12,000 faculty and staff, 15 colleges and the state's major public medical center. A hallmark of the campus is the Great Cities Commitment, through which UIC faculty, students and staff engage with community, corporate, foundation and government partners in hundreds of programs to improve the quality of life in metropolitan areas around the world.

For more information about UIC, visit www.uic.edu



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News