February 23, 2020         
Survival Guide for Allergy Season: Latest Tips According to Shirin Peters, M.D. With Bethany Medical Clinic   •   Coding Critters from Learning Resources® Codes Its Way To The Top As This Year's Preschool Toy Of The Year Award Winner   •   The Mexican Ministry of Tourism Has Been Recognised by Queer Destinations and the International Gay & Lesbian Travel Associa   •   The Association of Black Cardiologists Celebrates Fourth Annual Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day in Harlem   •   2nd STREET USA, Inc. to Open First East Coast Store on February 22, 2020, in Manhattan’s NoHo Neighborhood   •   L.O.L. Surprise! by MGA Entertainment Snags Prestigious "Toy of the Year" Award for Third Straight Year   •   CEMEX Announces Ambitious Strategy to Address Climate Change   •   SmartBear and Drift Present Candid Panel Discussion to Spotlight Racial Challenges in Tech   •   ADDING MULTIMEDIA Clean Beauty Meets K-Beauty: Feminine Care Brand Rael Expands Into Wellness Skincare Products   •   HITN’s Inaugural ¡Tú Cuentas! Cine Youth Festival Announces Call for Entries   •   VTech® Grows Baby, Infant, Toddler and Go! Go! Smart Wheels® Lines with Engaging New Additions   •   Every Kid Counts: Census Bureau Partners With Pediatricians and Child Advocates in Effort to Count Every Child in 2020 Census   •   RRD’s Customizable Kits Streamline the Path to a Better Brand Experience   •   Blake Shelton Joins the Lineup for the 2020 ‘iHeartCountry Festival Presented by Capital One’   •   LeapFrog® Announces New Blue's Clues & You! Toys Joining Expanded Infant and Preschool Learning Toy Collection   •   Toy Fair New York Opens Today; Exclusively Unveils 100,000+ New & Trending Toys & Games!   •   Top Toy Trends of 2020 Revealed at Toy Fair New York   •   Yellowstone Co-Creator Taylor Sheridan Signs Overall Production and Development Deal with ViacomCBS Entertainment & Youth Br   •   It's A Three-Peat! L.O.L. Surprise! Wins Toy Of The Year!   •   BodyLogicMD Announces $5,000 Scholastic Scholarship for Medical Students Interested in Pursuing a Career Focused in Achieving Be
Bookmark and Share

Race Trumps Experience For Jobs In Sports

RALEIGH - If you want to get your foot in the door of the sports industry, your race may mean more than your experience. That’s the major result of a new study from North Carolina State University that examined hiring decisions for entry-level sports management positions.

“Previous research has shown that management positions in the sports industry continue to be dominated by white males – and that a prejudice against blacks in managerial positions exists because of a perceived ‘lack of fit’ between being black and being a manager or leader,” explains Dr. Heidi Grappendorf, assistant professor of parks, recreation and tourism management at NC State. “We wanted to find out – when all other factors were considered equal – what  impact  race had on hiring for entry-level sports management positions.”

In the study, researchers created one-page resumes for fictitious job applicants. The resumes  all included identical work and education experience, but changed factors such as race, sex and previous participation as an athlete. The results showed resumes with traditional black names rated significantly lower than their white counterparts in terms of overall likeability, competency and likelihood of being hired.

The study showed male athletes benefit most from having an athletic background – as they have been evaluated as more competent for upper-level positions when compared to male non-athletes, female athletes and female non-athletes with identical athletic qualifications. While white male athletes did not receive significantly higher ratings than the other applicants (i.e., both blacks and whites), they did receive the highest ratings of all groups in both hiring and competence ratings.

“Our findings indicated that for black males and females, athletic participation provided no advantage in hiring recommendations,” Grappendorf says. “Clearly, athletic participation is not ‘superseding’ race. This contradicts previous findings indicating that the athletic role could be beneficial in the hiring process.”

Grappendorf and fellow researchers Laura Burton, from the University of Connecticut, and Angela Henderson, from theUniversity of Northern Colorado, recently presented their findings at the 2010 North American Society of Sport Management Conference.

NC State’s Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management is part of the university’s College of Natural Resources.


“Examining the Influence of Race, Gender, and Athletic Participation on Hiring Preferences in Sport Management”

Authors: Heidi Grappendorf, North Carolina State University; Laura Burton, University of Connecticut; and Angela Henderson, University of Northern Colorado

Presented: North American Society of Sport Management Conference in Tampa, Fla.

Abstract: Lapchick (2008), in the Racial and Gender Report Card that reports the hiring practices of women and people of color in leading sports organizations, reported that representation of racial minorities at NCAA institutions declined in comparison to previous report cards. In addition, the majority of general managers, senior administrators, and professional administrators in major league sports continue to be dominated by White males (Lapchick). Overall, there exists significant racial inequality in the general United States labor market (Bertrand & Mullainathan, 2004). Studies have shown that when employers were faced with a White and a Black applicant who share similar educational backgrounds and work experience, the White applicant was more likely to be chosen for employment and that employer prejudice or the perception of race may signal lower productivity of the Black applicants (Bertrand & Mullainathan). Prejudice can arise from the relations that people perceive between the characteristics of members of a social group and the requirements of the social roles that group members occupy (Eagly & Karau, 2002). When perceivers hold a stereotype about a social group that is incongruent with the attributes that are thought to be required for success in certain classes of social roles, a potential for prejudice exists. These stereotypes may potentially affect how males and females perceive Blacks in management and could even impact how they are judged once they enter the workforce.



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News