February 26, 2020         
Author Sam Van Galder's new book "Ethan's Animal Alphabet" is a vividly illustrated book featuring a menagerie of colorful anima   •   Greenberg Traurig's Christopher A. Mair Named to The National Black Lawyers 'Top 40 Under 40' in Illinois   •   Michelle Lynn VanMeter's newly released "The Old Rag Doll" is a heartwarming tale of a rag doll who brings joy to children   •   Small Business Trends Report Rebased by Guidant Financial Finds Number of Profitable Black-Owned Small Businesses Rises 5% Year   •   Persecution of the Local Church: Long Beach, California   •   Corporate Social Responsibility Related News Releases and Story Ideas for Reporters, Bloggers and Media Outlets   •   Washington Prime Group Announces HomeGoods to Open at Mesa Mall   •   TherapeuticsMD and Afaxys Enter Into Agreement to Expand Access to ANNOVERA® in the U.S. Public Health Sector   •   Mattel Announces Ruth Handler Mentorship Program for Women in Toys Timed to Company’s 75th Anniversary   •   Guard your state-of-the-art Samsung Galaxy S20 phone with Gadget Guard Black Ice Flex screen protector   •   K.L. Keltre's newly released "I Was There...: when baby Jesus was born" is an enthralling account that shows readers the series   •   Greenberg Traurig Represents Iraqi Refugee in Successful Pro Bono Case   •   “The 51st NAACP Image Awards” Illuminated the Airwaves With Black Excellence and Lit Up the Ratings With 1.8 Million   •   FIBRA Prologis Declares Quarterly Distribution   •   United States Supreme Court Rules Against 15-Year-Old Mexican National Killed By Border Patrol Agent   •   BBVA USA January Recap: Workplace equality, industry recognitions, and renewed sponsorship   •   Columbus Crew SC Announces Founding Partnership With OhioHealth and Naming Rights for Future Training Facility   •   ARC Makes Strong Debut on HRC’s 2020 Corporate Equality Index   •   Discover Recognized as a Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality For Seventh Consecutive Year   •   Baby Making After Valentine’s Day Means a Turkey Time Baby: Preparing for a Summer Bump & Thanksgiving Wobble
Bookmark and Share

RACIAL PROFILING HITS GEORGIA

ATLANTA – The Georgia legislature has passed a discriminatory law authorizing police to demand "papers" from people they stop who they suspect are not authorized to be in the U.S.  The law, a copycat version of the notorious law passed in Arizona, invites racial profiling of Latinos and others based on how they look or talk and interferes with federal law.  The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Georgia strongly condemned the legislature’s decision to pass this unconstitutional law and warned of the serious threat it poses to the civil liberties and public safety of all Georgians.

"This law undermines our core American values of fairness and equality and will make the rampant racial profiling of people of color that is already going on in Georgia that much worse, threatening the rights of citizens and non-citizens alike," said Debbie Seagraves, Executive Director of the ACLU of Georgia. "Authorizing police to demand papers from people on the street is a tactic commonly associated with police states, not robust democracies."

The Georgia law authorizes police to demand “papers” from people they stop in the course of an offense, including traffic violations.  All Georgians will have to carry “papers” on them at all times in order to avoid being detained while police try to determine their immigration status. The law creates new state-level immigration crimes and penalties that are inconsistent with federal law.  Most sections of the law will go into effect on July 1, 2011.   

“This law threatens the safety and security of all Georgians by diverting already limited resources away from law enforcement’s primary responsibility to provide protection and promote public safety in the community,” said Azadeh Shahshahani, ACLU of Georgia National Security/Immigrants’ Rights Project Director. “This ill-conceived law sends a clear message to communities that the authorities are not to be trusted, making them less likely to come forward as survivors of or witnesses to crime.”

The ACLU and a coalition of civil rights organizations filed a class action lawsuit in May 2010 challenging Arizona’s SB 1070, the discriminatory law that inspired Georgia’s bill, charging that it invites the racial profiling of Latinos and others deemed to look or sound “foreign,” violates the First Amendment and interferes with federal law. The Department of Justice also filed a lawsuit challenging the law and a federal appellate court recently upheld the Arizona district court decision to block the core provisions of the law.  

“We stand committed to defending the civil liberties of all Americans from unconstitutional laws that lead to racial profiling and ‘papers please’ harassment. The ACLU will continue to be on the front lines fighting discriminatory laws like these across the country,” said Omar Jadwat, staff attorney with the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project.



STORY TAGS: Arizona copycat law , Georgia legislature , racial profiling , ACLU , Hispanic News, Latino News, Mexican News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Latina, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News