Today's Date: January 17, 2022
Open English Named To GSV EdTech 150   •   Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) Study Shows Maternal COVID-19 Infection Increases Risks of Preterm Birth, Low Birth Weight a   •   Svenska Rikslagen: New political party in Sweden   •   Remembering David Stuart, A Visionary at Dean Street   •   Coach Has A Prayer: U.S. Supreme Court to Review Ninth Circuit Decision Preventing Coach from Taking a Knee at Midfield   •   /C O R R E C T I O N -- Color Street/   •   The Promise Homes Company, Largest Black-Owned Single-Family Rental Company in the U.S., Secures $200 Million Debt Facility From   •   WEBTOON and HYBE Launch 7FATES: CHAKHO in Collaboration with BTS   •   University of Phoenix College of Doctoral Studies Releases Whitepaper Outlining Strategy for Women’s Lifelong Employabilit   •   Shincheonji Church Holds Press Conference To Address New Parables Series Seminar, Calls for Love and Unity   •   FRANKiE4 Opens First Brick-and-Mortar Store and US Headquarters in Seattle   •   KB Home Announces the Grand Opening of Three New-home Communities at Spring Mountain Ranch in Riverside, California   •   BLESSED MOON, Korean Skincare Brand, Expands Into Global Markets With Vitamin Eye Cream ‘Eye Kit’   •   Frost & Sullivan and TERI's Sustainability 4.0 Awards 2021 Honor Companies Embedding Sustainability with Economic Value Crea   •   School Choice Fair on a Mission to Spread Education Info, Opportunities to All Families   •   KB Home Announces the Grand Opening of The Foothills, a New-home Community in San Marcos, California   •   Pallas Athena Women’s Fighting Championship: Canada’s First All-Women MMA League Debuts 15 January 2022   •   Media Professionals Muhammad Al-Yahyai and Dahem Al-Qahtani on "Alaraby: TV"   •   Hate Cannot Hold Us Hostage: A Muslim-Jewish Call to Solidarity   •   Author Robert W. Sewell's new book "Inspirational Poetic Writings" is a heartfelt collection of poems, spiritual songs, and writ
Bookmark and Share

Researchers Study Skin Cancer In Latinos

PHILADELPHIA — DNA repair capacity (DRC) measurements effectively identified individuals who were at high risk for non-melanoma skin cancer, and may be a useful method to evaluate the efficacy of preventive therapies, according to study results presented at the Third AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities.

“Our study showed that persons with low DRC have three times greater likelihood of having non-melanoma skin cancer as compared to those with high DRC,” said Manuel Bayona, M.D., Ph.D., professor of the Public Health Program at the Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico.
DRC is a complex cellular mechanism involving more than 200 proteins that is used to repair damage to DNA within cells. Bayona explained that DNA damage can be caused by exposure to solar ultraviolet light and other types of radiation, dietary factors and aging. DRC has been linked to several types of cancer development.
The researchers conducted a case-controlled study among participants in Puerto Rico to determine whether a reduced DRC was a risk factor for non-melanoma skin cancer.
After comparing DRC levels in 477 newly-diagnosed, non-melanoma skin cancer cases and 365 controls without cancer, they found that low DRC levels were strongly associated with non-melanoma skin cancer.
Bayona and colleagues also studied key risk factors and their possible association with DRC as predictors for non-melanoma skin cancer:

• demographics (age, gender) and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer;
• skin, hair and eye color, and presence of freckles;
• occupational and recreational sun exposure;
• sunscreen use;
• cigarette smoking;
• vitamins, aspirin and calcium intake;
• DRC levels; and,
• dermatological information and other variables that could provide an estimate of non-melanoma skin cancer risk.
These findings in Puerto Rico are consistent with previous studies conducted elsewhere, according to the researchers. Additionally, participants who did not use sunblock, did not take aspirin and/or did not take multivitamin supplements regularly had increased odds of non-melanoma skin cancer.
“Doctors could use DRC levels to monitor how non-melanoma skin cancer risk decreases in individuals taking cancer preventive therapies,” he said.

 


STORY TAGS: HISPANIC , LATINO , MEXICAN , MINORITY , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , DIVERSITY , LATINA , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News