July 4, 2020         
Citizens for a Pro-Business Delaware Slams Delaware Department of Correction and Governor Carney for Politicizing Mask Donations   •   Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Donates $50,000 to National Urban League   •   Coty Names Sue Y. Nabi Chief Executive Officer   •   U.S. Soldier Desperately Seeks Public Support to Bring His Two Dogs Home From Overseas   •   How Race And Implicit Bias Impact The Practice Of Law   •   Hormel Foods Announces Inspired Giving Commitment to Support Equity and Education   •   Most Americans Not Very Comfortable Returning to Restaurants, Retail Stores and Hotels for Next Three Months, Survey Shows   •   P&G to Webcast Discussion of Fourth Quarter 2019/20 Earnings Results on July 30   •   AJC, Lithuanian Jewish Community Urge Seimas Not to Honor Lithuanian Wartime Activist   •   Proposition 21! – California Rent Control Ballot Measure Now Heads to Voters in November as Campaign Rolls Out 200+ Endors   •   The ODP Corporation Releases 2020 Corporate Sustainability Report   •   All TTR Employees Get 12 Weeks Paid Parenting Leave   •   GrillGirl.com Launches “Grill School,” a Virtual Grilling Series to Empower Everyone to Learn to Grill   •   Trend Micro and Girls in Tech Partner to Help Close the Gender Gap in the Technology Industry   •   Chicago Gen Z Tech Activist Launches Dollar Campaign to Fund Virtual CS Summer Camp for 1,000 Black Youth During Dangerous Times   •   Support for Canada's Forest Sector Economic Recovery   •   e.l.f. Beauty Announces Agreement with Marathon Partners   •   Nintendo Download: Invert Your Aim, Invert Your World   •   Top Local Atlanta Executives and Leaders Join Women in Technology to Host Inaugural Virtual Gala, WIT Connect 2020   •   Smarter Homes. Better Life. - Covia and the Ziegler Link•age Funds Look to the Future of Middle-Market Senior Living
Bookmark and Share

AL SHARPTON BREAKS 20 YEAR SILENCE

 

Watch Excerpt Here

 

NEW YORK - It’s been more than 20 years since Al Sharpton. the black community activist,  led raucous street protests that turned violent and sensationalized a 15-yr.-old black girl’s story of racial sexual assault that was ultimately rejected by a grand jury that suggested she made it up.

Now, the Rev. Sharpton appears to be a different man, a more strategic and refined political fighter, a man President Obama recently visited to support his foundation’s fundraising event.

CBS reporter Lesley Stahl profiles the new Sharpton on 60 MINUTES, Sunday (8:00-9:00 PM, ET/PT).

“I've learned to pick my fights and also to be more strategic about my fight plan,” says Sharpton. “Doesn't mean it's not the same fight, but it means I'm a different and I'm a more seasoned fighter.”

But that doesn’t mean he’s not an agitator anymore. “Say refined agitator,” he tells Stahl.

Sharpton has broadened his advocacy, changing with the times to embrace causes that are more popular today than they were back in his brawling days. “A lot of positions I take now, no one would’ve thought I would’ve taken. Who would have thought 20 years ago I’d be leading a march for immigration? Or that I would support same-sex marriage, which most black church people don’t,” he says. “So I think that a lot of people are stuck in time. Thankfully, I’m not,” says Sharpton.

But Sharpton is stuck in time in a sense. In 1987, he led protests over Tawana Brawley’s story of a gang rape by six white men – some members of law enforcement, she claimed -- but still refuses to accept the grand jury’s finding. He charged a cover-up, led demonstrations against the findings and was eventually ordered by a court of law to pay restitution to some of those falsely accused.

Stahl asks why he’s never apologized to the falsely accused men. “I’ll be honest with you. I have thought about that a million times. I just don't believe they treated that case fair,” says Sharpton. Pressed by Stahl that anyone who knew he was part of a false accusation has the obligation to apologize for it, Sharpton replies, “I think you’re right. I think the operative word is: if you knew that. I don’t know that,” he tells Stahl. Watch an excerpt.

Sharpton also talks about his childhood and, later, the pivotal moment when he reconciled with his father, who abandoned the family when he was young.
 

 


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
Breaking News
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News