Today's Date: February 26, 2024
Avangrid Hosts Federal Leadership at New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal   •   FOUR SEASONS RESORT MAUI CELEBRATES SPRING BREAK WITH NEW SEASONAL EXPERIENCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUNG TRAVELERS FROM MARCH 10 -   •   Curative Names Ellen Sexton New Chief Operating Officer   •   The Economist Group appoints Luke Bradley-Jones President, The Economist   •   ANDREA LA'VERNE EDNEY SWORN IN AS FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMAN NATIONAL PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF TRIAL ADVOCATES   •   City of Hope Launches First-of-its-Kind Mobile Cancer Prevention and Screening Program   •   Arizona Athletic Grounds draws over 100,000 Attendees for Presidents Weekend   •   Experienced Legal and Computer Engineering Expert Jennifer Davis Brings Important Perspectives to Scrum Alliance® Board of D   •   Florida SouthWestern State College Selects YuJa Panorama Digital Accessibility Platform to Replace Former Accessibility Product   •   Dominion Energy and the Library of Virginia Honor Four Leaders as 'Strong Men & Women in Virginia History'   •   Supergoop! Appoints Beauty Industry Veteran Lisa Sequino as CEO to Lead Next Chapter of Growth   •   The Cymbiotika San Diego Open   •   Calvert Research and Management announces 100 Most Sustainable U.S. Companies   •   Crowe and Intuit QuickBooks collaborate on new program to enable minority-owned small business growth   •   Amway Honors ‘Heroes’ for Significant Contributions to Community and Country   •   Avangrid’s Customer Experience and Digital Center of Excellence Leading the Way   •   Big Blue Marble Academy in Mauldin Expands to New Location to Serve More Families in the Community   •   Watercrest St. Lucie West Assisted Living and Memory Care Honored with Prestigious Reputation 800 Award   •   Greenlight and Tropical Smoothie Cafe Join Forces to Reward Kids and Teens for Learning About the World of Money   •   Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute Announces Alumni Association South Florida Chapter
Bookmark and Share

Social Class May Impact Depression Treatment

 CHICAGO  — Current treatments for depression don't help working-class and poor patients as much as they help middle-class patients improve their ability to function at work, according to a recent University of Illinois at Chicago study.

Depression has a profound impact on an individual's productivity. That's particularly true among individuals in lower social classes and with lower levels of education, such as many of those in sales and support jobs, says Lydia Falconnier, assistant professor in UIC's Jane Addams College of Social Work.

Falconnier reviewed data from the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program from 1982 to 1986. Participants included 239 patients with major depressive disorder.

The study found that following treatment for depression, working class and poor patients' ability to function at work improved less than middle-class patients.

The same results were found for patients taking medication for depression or receiving one of two different kinds of psychotherapy: interpersonal psychotherapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy.

The study also has implications for the ability of current depression treatments to help depressed working-class and poor mothers to improve the care they provide for their children.

"This is particularly important since a lot of research shows negative outcomes for children of depressed mothers," said Falconnier, the study's principal investigator.

"This also raises questions about mandated depression treatment for working-class and poor mothers who are involved in the child welfare system."

Future research will be needed to discover what needs to change in depression treatment so that working class and poor patients can benefit from it as much as middle-class patients, Falconnier said.

"One route to improved outcomes might be to adapt current therapies to include a greater focus on the daily work and economic stressors that low-income individuals face," she said.

The study findings were published in a recent issue of the journal Psychiatric Services.

UIC ranks among the nation's leading research universities and is Chicago's largest university with 27,000 students, 12,000 faculty and staff, 15 colleges and the state's major public medical center. A hallmark of the campus is the Great Cities Commitment, through which UIC faculty, students and staff engage with community, corporate, foundation and government partners in hundreds of programs to improve the quality of life in metropolitan areas around the world.


STORY TAGS: GENERAL , BLACKS , AFRICAN AMERICAN , LATINO , HISPANIC , MINORITIES , CIVIL RIGHTS , DISCRIMINATION , RACISM , DIVERSITY , RACIAL EQUALITY , BIAS , EQUALITY



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News