September 25, 2020         
TherapeuticsMD Provides Update on Third Quarter Progress   •   Dow leaders recognized on 2020 HERoes Women Role Model lists   •   Pres. Donald Trump to speak on Friday Night at Family Research Council Action's Values Voter Summit 2020   •   ADEA Statement in Support of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Workplace Training   •   Celebrity Nitzia Chama Will Host Launch Event For KUL CBD Luxury Skincare At Curacao Department Stores   •   Curative Researchers Initiate Research Study to Test Efficacy of Self-Collected COVID-19 Tests   •   Censorship and the Dangers of Being Silenced   •   ThoughtWorks Named "Leader" in AnitaB.org's 2020 Top Companies for Women Technologists Program   •   Cubic Introduces New Ventra Mobile App for Chicagoland Travelers   •   Voting Could Be More Difficult for People with Disabilities This Year   •   Hard Rock International Announces Its Annual Pinktober® Campaign Pledging Support For Breast Cancer Awareness And Research   •   Laird Superfood Announces Closing of Initial Public Offering and Exercise in Full of the Underwriters’ Option to Purchase   •   Everything You Need To Know About PEOPLE EN ESPAÑOL's Festival 2020 Returning Virtually!   •   AHF Rings Alarm Over Nationwide Shortage of STD Test Kits   •   BlackNorth Initiative Applauds Recognition of Systemic Racism in Speech from the Throne- Commitment to Measurable Improvement in   •   UMD iSchool Awarded NSF Grant to Design Personalized Self-Tracking Tech for Older Adults to Improve Physical Activities   •   Association of Independent Mortgage Experts Partners with United Wholesale Mortgage and Home Point Financial to Introduce Small   •   C-Sweet Webinar: “How We Can Make Difference” Part Three in a Series on Why Diversity Matters   •   U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce Endorses Joe Biden   •   LegalShield Leadership Convention, Lead the Change, to Bring Record Number of Associates Together Virtually
Bookmark and Share

Stanford Revives Pre-Med Diversity Program

STANFORD, CA - The Stanford University School of Medicine’s Health Careers Opportunity Program is back, with new collaborators and a sharper focus, but the same objective: To enhance diversity in the health professions.

After shutting down the program in 2007 for three years because of a lack of federal funding, HCOP returns to Stanford thanks to a three-year, $3 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Instead of just reinstating Stanford’s previous version of HCOP, the new funding enables the school’s Center of Excellence in Diversity in Medical Education to partner with UC-Berkeley’s School of Public Health, San Francisco State University and other organizations. Additionally, rather than drawing students from throughout the nation for the summer program, the new HCOP calls for the educational institutions and clinical internship programs to work together to reach students in four Bay Area counties: Alameda, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara.

“Each of these programs has a history of functioning on its own,” said Ronald Garcia, PhD, assistant dean for minority affairs at the medical school and principal investigator for the San Francisco Bay Area Comprehensive HCOP grant. “What I think will be of value is the synergy of all these institutions working together. My hope is that we will be of greater benefits to students in the Bay Area.”

Stanford’s summer HCOP provides a six-week residential program for undergraduate students interested in pursuing health-care careers. The program’s goal is to increase diversity in the health professions by working with students who have faced financial or other barriers to academic success in preparing for careers in medicine.

“The pathway to a health profession is very mysterious, and very complicated. That’s where we come in, in terms of HCOP, demystifying that process,” said Garcia.

Keeping the summer residential program focused on local students will help HCOP leaders to stay in touch with them as they move through the medical school application process and beyond, Garcia said, emphasizing that “continuity is so important for these students.”

The summer residential program provides students with premedical academic advising; mentorship from Stanford medical students, faculty and staff; and instruction in health research, anatomy, cell biology, minority health issues and demographic health-care disparities. Garcia said the program also encourages students to get involved in health care in their communities.

Undergraduate students participate in HCOP during the summer after their sophomore or junior year. Garcia said the experience the students gain through the program strengthens their preparation for applying to medical school.

Stanford will begin accepting student applications Nov. 15 for the residential program that will be offered in the summer of 2011.

 

 


STORY TAGS: BLACK, AFRICAN AMERICAN, MINORITY, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, NAACP, URBAN LEAGUE, RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News