Today's Date: March 6, 2021
Affect Study Reveals the Significant Impact of COVID-19 on Women in the Workplace   •   Reliant Joins Forces With Rebuilding Together to Help Houstonians Recovering From Winter Storm Damage   •   Celebrity Cruises' History-Making All-Female Bridge And Leadership Team Reunite   •   Sartorius is a corporate partner of the Healthcare Businesswomen's Association   •   El Camino Health Nationally Recognized as a Best Maternity Care Hospital by Newsweek   •   Statement on Visit of Pope Francis to Iraq   •   Boot Barn Holdings, Inc. Announces Participation in the UBS Global Consumer and Retail Virtual Conference   •   Government of Canada COVID-19 Update for Indigenous Peoples and communities   •   Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Canadian Coast Guard Confirm New Regions' Boundaries to Improve Services to the Arctic   •   Bigo Live, ANTRA and The Equality Project celebrate Mardi Gras and inclusion of LGBTQIA+ communities in Australia   •   International Women’s Day: ARM & HAMMER™ Laundry Detergent Proudly Sponsors Dress for Success’ Your Hour,   •   Lafarge Canada Once Again Recognized as One of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers   •   Appleseed's Celebrates 75th Anniversary   •   Analytics Insight Names 'The 10 Most Impactful Women in Technology’ in March 2021   •   Norwegian Cruise Line Commemorates International Women's Day With Month-Long Empowerment Program   •   Recording Academy® Partners With Berklee College of Music and Arizona State University to Conduct Study on Women's Represent   •   Governor Ron Desantis Visits On Top Of The World Communities   •   BlogHer to celebrate International Women's Day with Priyanka Chopra Jonas, Debra Messing, Ai-jen Poo, and other changemakers ded   •   Customers Bank Backs SBA’s Stronger Support for Sole Proprietors, Independent Contractors, Self-Employed Individuals, as w   •   New York Women in Communications Launches #WOMENHEARD
Bookmark and Share

Study Casts Doubt On Universal Kindergarten Benefits For Blacks

 

 


 

--Large state investments in universal early-childhood education programs do not necessarily yield clear benefits for more disadvantaged students--

 

STANFORD--A new study by Dartmouth economist Elizabeth Cascio finds that state funding of universal kindergarten has some long-term benefit for white students but does not necessarily yield clear benefits for African American students.  The results of Cascio’s research appear in the forthcoming issue of Education Next.

 

Cascio found that white children who participated in state-funded universal pre-kindergarten were less likely to be high school dropouts and likely to be incarcerated or otherwise institutionalized as adults. College attendance also increased among whites, but by a smaller amount than the dropout rate.  Cascio found no positive effects for African Americans in any of these areas, despite comparable increases in their enrollment in public kindergartens.

 

The study also showed no discernible impact for either group on many of the long-term outcomes desired by policymakers, including minimizing grade retention and dependence on public assistance and positively impacting later employment and earnings.

 

Cascio’s study sheds light on the likely consequences of any new universal program by estimating the impact of earlier state interventions to introduce kindergarten into public schools. In the 1960s and 1970s, many states, particularly in the southern and western parts of the country, began offering grants to school districts operating kindergarten programs. Districts were quick to respond. The average state experienced a significant increase in its kindergarten enrollment rate within two years after an initiative. To understand the long-term impacts of universal kindergarten, Cascio investigated programs in the 24 states that introduced state funding for universal kindergarten after 1960.

 

In considering why African Americans might not have benefited as much as whites from state’s kindergarten funding initiatives, Cascio hypothesizes that kindergarten funding may have disproportionately drew African Americans out of higher-quality education settings.  Cascio found that the introduction of state funding for kindergarten prompted a reduction in Head Start participation among African Americans. Head Start has historically been an important education provider for five-year-olds in the absence of public kindergarten.

 

Overall, the study’s findings suggest that, in the absence of higher-quality alternatives, participation in a low intensity preschool program may have some limited positive long term effects.

 

“Even a weak program may be better than no program at all, as can be seen in the results for whites,” Cascio writes. “When alternatives already exist for many disadvantaged children, however, universal programs may not yield additional benefits for that group.”

 

Read “What Happened When Kindergarten Went Universal?” available online at www.educationnext.org.

 

Elizabeth U. Cascio is assistant professor of economics at Dartmouth College.

 

Education Next is a scholarly journal published by the Hoover Institution that is committed to looking at hard facts about school reform. Other sponsoring institutions are the Harvard Program on Education Policy and Governance and the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation.

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
Caleb Offley (585) 319-4541
Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-6010
www.hoover.org

 


 



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
Breaking News
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News