June 2, 2020         
Wayfair to Present at the Oppenheimer 20th Annual Consumer Growth and E-Commerce Conference   •   Caps and Gowns Go On at Home: iQ Academy Minnesota to Celebrate Class of 2020 with Online Commencement   •   Auction of Alamo battle relics and Republic of Texas documents takes place June 6   •   Sheremetyevo Airport Prioritizes the Needs of Children   •   Trulieve Launches Limited Edition Cartridge, Partners with Florida-Based LGBTQ+ Organizations for Pride Month   •   Statement from Ministers Carolyn Bennett, Daniel Vandal, Marc Miller and Steven Guilbeault on National Indigenous History Month   •   The Executive Leadership Council Statement on Racial Injustice and Disparities Facing the Black Community   •   OCHIN Supports Movement for Racial Justice and Advancements in Health Equity   •   News Photographers Association of Canada Reacts to Press Freedom Violations   •   Essence Ventures Hires Caroline Wanga as New Chief Growth Officer   •   TherapeuticsMD Announces Appointment of James C. D’Arecca as Chief Financial Officer and Retirement of Daniel A. Cartwrigh   •   Maine Virtual Academy Celebrates 2020 Graduates in a COVID Era: School Will Provide Pre-Recorded Ceremonies So Families Can Acce   •   Cedar Fair to Participate June 2nd in the Goldman Sachs 2020 Travel and Leisure Conference, Audio Webcast Available   •   Rain's newly released "My Big Sister Has Diabetes" is a heartwarming perspective of a young kid whose sister is dealing with a h   •   CHPA Launches Rebranding Effort as Consumer Health Becomes More Vital to Public Health   •   Finalists Announced for 2020 Braille Challenge Finals   •   RGENIX Shows Clinical Activity of Novel Agent RGX-202 in Patients with KRAS Mutant Colorectal Cancer in Phase 1 Trial   •   Latino Business Action Network Announces 9th Cohort of the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative Education-Scaling Program   •   LetsGetChecked Debuts FDA EUA-Authorized At-Home Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sure-track Test   •   Christopher & Banks Corporation Announces First Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call
Bookmark and Share

Study Yields Breakthrough For Blacks With Heart Disease

 

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — UC Davis researchers have discovered that a blood component linked with inflammation can predict coronary artery disease in African-Americans.

Known as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), the blood factor is also associated with but does not accurately predict heart-disease risk in Caucasians. The findings are published in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

“This study suggests that inflammation may be a more important mechanism in heart disease for African-Americans than it is for Caucasians and increases our growing understanding of how heart-disease processes vary in different ethnic groups,” said Lars Berglund, senior study author and associate dean for research at the UC Davis School of Medicine. “The more we appreciate such differences, the better we can individualize treatment and prevention approaches.”

Lp-PLA2 was recently identified as a marker for the inflammatory processes involved in atherosclerosis. It is considered key to the progression and rupture of fatty plaques that can block coronary arteries and lead to heart attacks. It predominately binds to low-density lipoprotein — or LDL — which is a general marker of increased heart-disease risk. Berglund noted, though, that more well-known factors like LDL and high cholesterol cannot provide the whole picture of heart disease.

“There are other important elements of heart disease — like inflammation — that need to be better explained,” he said.

For the current study, Berglund and his team measured Lp-PLA2 levels in the blood of 336 Caucasians and 224 African-Americans who were about to undergo diagnostic coronary arteriography — a test used to determine coronary artery disease in high-risk patients — at two hospitals in New York. Coronary arteriography findings were compared with the amount and activity levels of Lp-PLA2 from each research subject.

During the procedure, contrast dye and X-rays are used to detect narrowed or blocked arteries, indicating the potential for heart attacks.

“Arteriography is highly effective but considered too risky and expensive for general screening,” said Berglund. “That is why researchers are always on the lookout for other reliable predictors of heart-attack risk that can be identified with a simple blood test.”

The outcomes showed that Lp-PLA2 activity was higher among Caucasians and African-Americans with coronary artery disease. In addition, only in African-Americans was the Lp-PLA2 index found to independently predict coronary artery disease.

Although the test for Lp-PLA2 is widely available, Berglund said it is too soon to recommend widespread testing to affect treatment decisions. The study population was not representative of the general population as all participants already had symptoms of heart disease. Berglund’s team plans further studies of Lp-PLA2 and other inflammatory components of the blood in a wider range of patients to get a clearer picture of their roles in predicting heart disease for different ethnic and racial groups. The outcomes of his current study, however, give him hope that African-Americans at high risk for heart disease will one day be treated for inflammation more aggressively and earlier in the disease process.

“This study has helped open the field,” said Berglund. “More information will allow us to better tailor therapy to specific patient needs.”

In addition to Berglund, other study authors included Erdembileg Anuurad and Byambaa Enhkmaa of UC Davis, Thomas Pearson of the University of Rochester and Zeynep Ozturk of the University of Istanbul.

The study was funded by grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center and the American Heart Association.

About the Clinical and Translational Science Center:
The UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center is part of a national consortium, led by the National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health, which is improving how biomedical research is conducted across the nation. Its goals are to reduce the time it takes for research discoveries to become treatments for patients, as well as to train the next generation of clinical researchers. For more information, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/ctsc.


UC Davis Health System, 2315 Stockton Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95817 United States



Back to top
| Back to home page
Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News