July 2, 2020         
Scott’s Liquid Gold Announces New Credit Facility with UMB   •   Children's Hospital Colorado Releases Guidance to Help Schools, Including Those in Rural Communities, Safely Return to In-Person   •   Les Dames d'Escoffier International Establishes the LDEI Relief Fund   •   Christine Michel Carter Co-Hosts Event Discussing How COVID-19 And Black Lives Matter Disproportionately Affect Black Moms   •   Law Professor Jody Armour's "N*gga Theory" Puts Racialized Mass Incarceration and the Black Lives Matter Movement into Context f   •   Walmart Launches Virtual Summer Camp and Drive-In Movie Theater to Help Families Make the Most of Summer   •   Rental Affordability Act Endorsed by Top Latino Leaders, Taps NorCal Campaign Regional Chair   •   FOX Entertainment’s AVOD Service Tubi Adds 30 Seasons of Cult Phenom The Joy of Painting Featuring Bob Ross   •   Proposition 21! – California Rent Control Ballot Measure Now Heads to Voters in November as Campaign Rolls Out 200+ Endors   •   Minister Farrakhan to deliver major July 4 worldwide address   •   Faisal Hossain Named First Medidata Founders’ Scholarship Award Winner   •   American Honda Sales Continue Recovery, Despite Inventory Issues and COVID-19 Business Challenges   •   CORRECTING and REPLACING WorldRemit Celebrates the Launch of Their Remittance Service in Somalia   •   Landmark War Heroes on Water Tournament Set to Expand in 2021   •   Watercrest Senior Living Group and Partners Celebrate the Groundbreaking of Watercrest Myrtle Beach Assisted Living and Memory C   •   Abuse Survivors Take Action to Hold Kurn Hattin Homes for Children Accountable for Decades of Abuse, Reports ACFW   •   BOMBAY SAPPHIRE® Gin Collaborates With Hebru Brantley To Launch First-Ever Artist Designed Bottle   •   Comedy Central Doubles Down on Adult Animation With a Reimagined “Beavis and Butt-Head”   •   Tractor Supply Company Teams up With the American Kennel Club in Support of Dogs and Owners   •   FIBRA Prologis to Host Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call July 23
Bookmark and Share

The Winners And Losers Of "March Madness"

 WINSTON-SALEM, NC - As millions of viewers tune in to March Madness this month, an increasingly vocal group of experts is calling attention to the growing divide between the big business of NCAA sports and the well-being of student athletes who are generating record revenues for their universities.

“Low graduation rates among certain student athletes, the lack of pay for college players, and improprieties in the recruiting process are just some of the hot button issues making headlines this year,” said Timothy Davis, one of the country’s best known law scholars and the John W. & Ruth H. Turnage Professor of Law at Wake Forest University. Davis urges student athletes, their parents, and athletic administrators to consider these facts:

Winners and Losers: A new report shows while 2010 tournament teams graduated 84 percent of their white male athletes, only 56 percent of black male athletes earned their college degree. Yet black athletes make up the majority of Division I collegiate basketball players.

No Pay for Play: The NCAA recently inked a 14-year, $10.8 billion deal with CBS and Turner Sports to broadcast the March Madness tournament games, and top coaches regularly take home paychecks that number in the millions. Yet many student athletes, and especially those of color, often struggle to make ends meet as their benefits are largely restricted to the value of their scholarships. 

Unfair Advantage - The case of Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton once again put the spotlight on improper recruiting practices for college athletes. Now experts are calling into question practices used to induce athletes in general.

After the final whistle blows on the Championship Game in April, an unprecedented team of experts will gather at Wake Forest University to discuss these and other issues. The conference, entitled Losing to Win: Discussions of Race and Intercollegiate Sports, will examine solutions to the challenges currently facing college athletics, particularly as they relate to minority student athletes.

“We believe this is a vitally important conversation that needs to be held if we are to see changes in current practices that harm our student athletes and their institutions,” said Davis, an organizer of the conference. “We plan to continue the dialogue long after March Madness ends so that we will hopefully move closer to enacting reforms.”


STORY TAGS: March Madness , NCAA BasketballBlack News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, Hispanic News, Latino News, Mexican News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Latina, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News