Today's Date: April 22, 2021
Jim Corrigan Named Chief Executive Officer of ConnectiveRx   •   World Trade Center Institute Celebrates "Finding Strength Through Sisterhood" at 15th Annual Women Spanning the Globe Conference   •   Lyndale Edmond Senior Living Celebrates the 103rd Birthday of Former Rosie the Riveter   •   OneUnited Bank Announces 11th Anniversary "I Got Bank" National Financial Literacy Contest For Youth   •   Scrub Daddy Announces Their Recycling Rewards Program   •   MONAT Recognized as a Top Direct Selling Company and Best Place to Work by Direct Selling News   •   National Survey Finds 86% of Consumers are Aware of Window Covering Cord Safety Hazards   •   Veritas Announces Launch of EduSafe Pooled PCR Testing with Automatic Follow-Up For K-12 Schools, Childcare Centers and Summer C   •   TORTIYAHS!® Brand Ushers in Cinco De Mayo With Promotions & Sweepstakes!   •   Lower Black Infant Mortality Rates in Los Angeles is Goal Of New Health Net-Funded Grant for Cherished Futures   •   Black Workers Lose Ground on Living-Wage Jobs in March, According to LISEP   •   Delaney & Co.'s New Party & Play Lab Collection Makes Its Official Debut   •   Philips Joins Forces with National Minority Quality Forum to Address Healthcare Disparities   •   ESSENCE Announces Presenters for 14th Annual ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood Awards Airing Thursday, April 22nd, at 7 pm (ET)   •   St. Jude Mom Boss Summit gathers "mom bosses" of all backgrounds to connect, support St. Jude Children's Research Hospital   •   TMX Group Announces Support of Amended Shareholder Proposal   •   Oath Announces $2 Million in Seed Funding to Reinvent Healthcare Experience Starting With Motherhood   •   Short Film 'IN THE VISIBLE' Is Now Available On YouTube   •   STEM NOLA Receives $1.25M to Seed 42,000 SF STEM NOLA Innovation HUB and Expand Award-Winning STEM Programming   •   GE Appliances Marks Earth Day 2021 By Joining UN Global Compact
Bookmark and Share

Higher HIV Risk In Black Gay Men Linked To Partner Choice, Risk Perception

BALTIMORE — Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) get infected with HIV nearly five times more often than MSM from other races, even though they don't have more unprotected sex.

The discrepancy has long mystified public health experts but a new study by investigators at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere now offers a possible explanation for it.

The study found that young black MSM -- a group that includes openly gay and bisexual men, as well as those who have sex with men but do not identify themselves as gay or bisexual -- select partners and judge these partners' HIV status in a specific way.

These men show a clear preference for masculine men, while also equating masculinity with lower HIV risk. This dynamic, the researchers say, can help explain why young black MSM contract HIV more often than their counterparts from other races.

The results are based on interviews with 35 black men ages 18 to 24 who have sex with men. The most notable findings include an overwhelming preference for masculine partners, accepting masculine partners as dominant in the sex act and leaving to them decisions about condom use, perceiving masculine men as low risk for HIV and feminine men as high risk.

"There may be no difference in HIV prevalence between masculine-looking and feminine-looking men, but because black MSM perceive masculine men as lower risk, their sexual encounters with such men may make HIV infection more likely," said investigator Jonathan Ellen, M.D., a pediatrician and teen health expert at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

In other words, even though young black MSM have unprotected sex just as often as others, they may be having unprotected sex in riskier ways with partners whose HIV status they often miscalculate, the researchers explain.

The findings offer new insight into how black MSM judge risk based on perceptions of masculinity and can help inform public health campaigns to reduce new HIV infections in this disproportionately affected group. The findings, the researchers say, can also guide safe-sex conversations between primary care physicians and patients.

Errol Fields, M.D. Ph.D., currently a resident at Boston Children's Hospital, was lead author on the research, which he conducted as a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Researchers from Children's Hospital Boston and Emory University also participated in the study. 


STORY TAGS: Black News, African American News, Minority News, Civil Rights News, Discrimination, Racism, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality, Afro American News, General, Black News, African American News, Latino News, Hispanic News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News