June 2, 2020         
Finalists Announced for 2020 Braille Challenge Finals   •   OCHIN Supports Movement for Racial Justice and Advancements in Health Equity   •   Christopher & Banks Corporation Announces First Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call   •   Statement from Ministers Carolyn Bennett, Daniel Vandal, Marc Miller and Steven Guilbeault on National Indigenous History Month   •   Trulieve Launches Limited Edition Cartridge, Partners with Florida-Based LGBTQ+ Organizations for Pride Month   •   CHPA Launches Rebranding Effort as Consumer Health Becomes More Vital to Public Health   •   Caps and Gowns Go On at Home: iQ Academy Minnesota to Celebrate Class of 2020 with Online Commencement   •   News Photographers Association of Canada Reacts to Press Freedom Violations   •   Maine Virtual Academy Celebrates 2020 Graduates in a COVID Era: School Will Provide Pre-Recorded Ceremonies So Families Can Acce   •   Jill Jaglowski Joins Financial Gravity Subsidiary Forta Financial as EVP - Advisor Experience   •   Wayfair to Present at the Oppenheimer 20th Annual Consumer Growth and E-Commerce Conference   •   TherapeuticsMD Announces Appointment of James C. D’Arecca as Chief Financial Officer and Retirement of Daniel A. Cartwrigh   •   Sheremetyevo Airport Prioritizes the Needs of Children   •   Auction of Alamo battle relics and Republic of Texas documents takes place June 6   •   RGENIX Shows Clinical Activity of Novel Agent RGX-202 in Patients with KRAS Mutant Colorectal Cancer in Phase 1 Trial   •   The Executive Leadership Council Statement on Racial Injustice and Disparities Facing the Black Community   •   Essence Ventures Hires Caroline Wanga as New Chief Growth Officer   •   Cedar Fair to Participate June 2nd in the Goldman Sachs 2020 Travel and Leisure Conference, Audio Webcast Available   •   Rain's newly released "My Big Sister Has Diabetes" is a heartwarming perspective of a young kid whose sister is dealing with a h   •   LetsGetChecked Debuts FDA EUA-Authorized At-Home Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sure-track Test
Bookmark and Share

Unintentional Racial Biases May Affect Economic, Trust Decisions


NEW YORK - Psychologists have found that people may make economic and trust decisions based on unconscious or unintentional racial biases. The study, conducted in the laboratory of New York University Professor Elizabeth Phelps, is published in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Decisions in the worlds of business, law, education, medicine, and even more ordinary daily interactions between individuals, all rely on trust,” the researchers wrote. “In an increasingly globalized economy, that trust must be forged between individuals who differ in background, shared experiences, and aspirations.”

“These results provide evidence that decisions we may believe to be consciously determined are, in fact, not entirely so, and suggest that this may have a very real cost for individuals and society,” they continued. “Whom we trust is not only a reflection of who is trustworthy, but also a reflection of who we are.”

The field of psychology has generally concluded that there is a distinction between explicit and implicit mental processes, including attitudes, beliefs, and self-perceptions. Explicit mental processes involve intentional decisions or judgments while implicit mental processes occur relatively automatically and without awareness. In the PNAS study, the researchers focused on implicit social bias, a measure of how strongly one associates a concept—for instance, “pleasant” or “unpleasant”—with different social groups. Recent scholarship has shown implicit biases are pervasive and can predict social behaviors, including the decisions of highly trained professionals such as doctors.

Employing a commonly used Implicit Association Test (IAT), researchers asked 50 racially diverse participants to rate the trustworthiness of individuals depicted in just under 300 photographs of Black, White, Asian, Hispanic, and mixed race men on a scale from one (“not-at-all trustworthy”) to nine (“extremely trustworthy”). The participants were instructed to report their initial “gut impressions.”

The researchers found that the participants’ implicit race attitudes, measured in a subsequent test, predicted disparities in the perceived trustworthiness of Black and White faces. Individuals whose tests demonstrated a stronger pro-White implicit bias were more likely to judge White faces as more trustworthy than Black faces, and vice versa, regardless of that individual’s own race or explicit beliefs.

In a similar experiment using another group of participants, the researchers assessed how implicit racial biases may affect economic or business decisions. Participants were shown the images of the same individuals used in the first experiment and told these individuals were the subjects’ partners and had been previously interviewed by the experimenter. Participants then had to make decisions about how much money they would risk with these partners.

The researchers found that participants’ implicit racial biases predicted racial disparities in the amounts of money participants were willing to risk in this trust-based interpersonal economic interaction. Specifically, individuals whose IAT scores reflected a stronger pro-White implicit bias were likely to offer more money to White than Black partners and vice versa.

According to the authors, the results suggest that implicit biases toward social groups may drive rapid evaluations of unfamiliar individuals in the absence of additional information, despite our conscious desires and intentions.

While the study’s subjects in both experiments included multiple racial groups, the race of the participants did not account for the findings.

“There is not a simple correspondence between individuals' implicit racial attitudes and their own race,” the researchers explained. “Implicit attitudes are thought to result from many sources beyond one’s own race, including environmental exposure and personal interactions.”

The authors were: Damian Stanley and Peter Sokol-Hessner, graduates of NYU’s doctoral program in neural science and now post-doctoral research fellows at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech); Mahzarin Banaji, a professor in Harvard University’s Department of Psychology; and Phelps, a professor of psychology and neural science.


STORY TAGS: General, Black News, African American News, Latino News, Hispanic News, Minority News, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Racism, Diversity, Racial Equality, Bias, Equality

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News