August 7, 2020         
REAL SIMPLE Announces Second Annual Smart Money Awards   •   #iVoted Initiative to Break All Records with Election Night Virtual Concerts   •   ComEd Reminds Customers of Expanded Assistance Options to Help with Energy Bills   •   Aymée Nuviola on CALA: "I have coronavirus and I'm already in the recovery process"   •   Eagle Hill Consulting Hosts Webinar Series on Diversity and Inclusion   •   2020 Women Tech Awards Finalists Named   •   More than $600,000 in Humanitarian Aid for Refugees Destroyed in Beirut Explosion   •   AtriCure Announces Angie Wirick as Chief Financial Officer   •   Government of Canada is providing assistance to urban Indigenous organizations in the Greater Toronto Area to address the COVID-   •   Housing Rights Advocates to Burbank City Council: Stop Wasting Taxpayer Money   •   March For Our Lives & Sankofa Present "Into Action" Featuring John Legend, Usher, Stacey Abrams, Billy Porter, and More   •   Back-to-School Without a Glitch: Arizona Virtual Academy Opens its Online Doors for the New School Year   •   Mycovia Pharmaceuticals CEO Patrick Jordan Named 2020 Life Sciences CEO of the Year by Triangle Business Journal   •   Genentech Provides Update on Phase III Study of Tecentriq in Combination With Paclitaxel for People With Metastatic Triple-Negat   •   Ford Fund and 1863 Ventures Announce Next HI-HERImpact Pitch Competition   •   Child Presence Detection System Market Worth US$ 390.3 Million by 2025   •   thyssenkrupp Elevator's Alison Powers Wins Women of Technology Award   •   Genes in Space selects winning student experiment to be performed on International Space Station   •   Alcohol Justice Reports California Health and Safety Advocates Alarmed by Increase in Binge Drinking During Shelter-in-Place Ord   •   Class Is in Session for Hearthstone® Players—New Expansion Scholomance Academy™ Now Live!
Bookmark and Share

Univ. Of GA Marks 50 Years Of Desegregation

 ATHENS, GA  – The University of Georgia will mark the 50th anniversary of its desegregation with a series of events starting on Jan. 9—the date in 1961 when Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter ( now Hunter-Gault ) became the first African Americans to register for classes—and continuing for 50 days through Feb. 28, the end of Black History Month. 


Hunter-Gault will return to campus for a kick-off reception on Jan. 9 that also will include the family of the late Hamilton Holmes and Mary Frances Early, who transferred to UGA as a graduate student in the summer of 1961 and the next year became the first African American to earn a degree when she received her master’s in music education.Holmes and Hunter-Gault graduated in 1963.


The reception, which is free and open to the public, will be from 6-8 p.m. in the Grand Hall of the Tate Student Center.


On Jan. 10, Hunter-Gault will deliver a 50th anniversary lecture at 3 p.m. in Mahler Auditorium of the Georgia Center for Continuing Education Conference Center and Hotel.Overflow seating will be available in Masters Hall, with a live video feed. 


A panel discussion of the legal issues involved in the university’s desegregation will follow in Masters Hall at 5 p.m. Participants will include Horace Ward, who first challenged UGA’s discriminatory admissions policies after being denied admission to the School of Law in 1950, and Robert Benham, who earned a law degree from UGA in 1970 and later became the first African-American chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court.Ward, who served on Holmes and Hunter’s legal team, was appointed a U.S. District Judge in 1979 and is currently a Senior District Judge. 


At 8 p.m., the premiere campus screening of a documentary on Donald Hollowell, who led the legal team that secured admission for Holmes and Hunter, will be held in Masters Hall.The documentary was produced by Maurice Daniels, dean of the School of Social Work, and Derrick Alridge, director of the Institute for African American Studies.


Hunter-Gault also will participate in a conversation with students in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, from which she earned her degree, on Jan. 11.The event will be recorded.The Grady College is promoting a college-wide read of her 1992 memoir In My Place prior to her return to campus. 


Also on Jan. 11, noted poet, author and activist Sonia Sanchez will participate in a dialogue moderated by Valerie Boyd, the Charlayne Hunter-Gault Writer-in-Residence in the Grady College, and featuring poet Reginald McKnight, who holds the Hamilton Holmes Professorship in English.The event is at 2 p.m. in the Grand Hall of the Tate Student Center with a reception and book-signing following.


Another panel discussion is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. that day in 101 Miller Learning Center with UGA faculty authors Maurice Daniels, who wrote a biography of Horace Ward; Robert Pratt, who chronicled UGA’s desegregation in We Shall Not Be Moved; and Thomas Dyer, who included a chapter on the event in his bicentennial history of UGA.Joining them will be Robert Cohen, professor of history and social studies at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, who also has written about UGA’s desegregation.


The week concludes with the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Breakfast with Mary Frances Early as the speaker. Co-sponsored by the university, the Athens-Clarke County Government and the Clarke County School District, the event will be at 7:30 a.m. Jan. 14 in the Grand Hall of the Tate Student Center.Advance reservations are needed and should be made through the Office of Institutional Diversity ( 706/583-8195 ).


Early also will visit with students at J.J. Harris Elementary Charter School on Jan. 13 for an event sponsored by UGA’s College of Education and the Institute for African American Studies. 




“We really want to encourage the campus community and the local community to participate in this landmark occasion,” said Cheryl Dozier, associate provost for institutional diversity, who co-chairs the planning committee with Derrick Alridge. “There are so many ways to do so and we are excited to see the creativity being shown by UGA departments and student groups in finding ways to celebrate the courage of Hamilton Holmes, Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Mary Frances Early, as well as those who supported them and those who have followed in their footsteps.” 


STORY TAGS: BLACK NEWS, AFRICAN AMERICAN NEWS, MINORITY NEWS, CIVIL RIGHTS NEWS, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM, RACIAL EQUALITY, BIAS, EQUALITY, AFRO AMERICAN NEWS

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News