Today's Date: February 27, 2024
Cincinnati Children's names Bob Carpenter senior vice president and chief legal officer   •   Divi Resorts Celebrates Leap Day With Bonus Savings for One Day Only!   •   OneLegacy Inspires Hollywood to Host Community Wellness Event Featuring Celebrity Guests and Hip Hop Legend, Freeway to Close Bl   •   Brent Rodriguez Returns to WellQuest Living as VP of Sales and Marketing Signaling Growth for the Senior Living Company   •   Des Nedhe Group and EPCOR launching new partnership to develop water treatment facility at Grasswood Junction   •   Monumo's Anser Engine Achieves Record 10 Million Simulations in 24 Hours   •   myFICO: Save Money by Understanding How Credit Card Interest Works   •   TextFree by Pinger, the Original Free Texting App, Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary   •   EDF Renewables North America Signs Agreement with Southern California Public Power Authority for Solar+Storage Energy Project   •   /C O R R E C T I O N -- VetComm/   •   Watercrest Senior Living Group Celebrates the Promotion of Jessica Desjarlais to Director of Associate Experience   •   F&W and Everwood Forge Strategic Equity Partnership; F&W Expands in U.S. to Inland Northwest   •   Comcast Announces Premiere of the Inspiring Black Girls Documentary on Black Experience on Xfinity Platform   •   Watercrest Macon Assisted Living and Memory Care Honored with Prestigious Reputation 800 Award   •   LA Rams, It's Bigger Than Us, Pepsi and LA Regional Food Bank Join Forces to Address Food and Nutrition Insecurity   •   Government of Canada helps Edmonton church improve community safety against hate-motivated crimes   •   ComEd’s Innovative Efforts to Support Low-Income Customers Receive North American Industry Award   •   University of Phoenix Academic Leadership Presenting at 1EdTech Digital Credentials Summit   •   Flinn Foundation Names Leadership of Arizona’s Statewide Bioscience Committee   •   THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF LEARNING
Bookmark and Share

Urban Women Worldwide Share Health Problems

 

 

PHILADELPHIA,  -- For the first time in history, more than half of the world's population lives in urban environments, and the Penn-ICOWHI 18th Conference will explore redesigning cities for active living, increasing access to health care, treating adolescent girls in high-risk environments, eliminating policy gaps that undermine women's health, and curbing intimate-partner violence.

The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, with the International Congress of Women's Health Issues, will host "Cities and Women's Health: Global Perspectives," Wednesday, April 7, through Saturday, April 10, on Penn's campus to examine the health disparities shared by urban women across the world, and kicked off by President Obama's Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Health Melanne Verveer.

The Penn-ICOWHI conference will bring international experts in city planning, health policy, public policy, education, sociology, and others together to address how health issues facing women  are exacerbated by city living. Speakers will include:

  • A refugee from Kenya who will discuss the health of women affected by post-election violence
  • A Women's Health Volunteer from Iran; currently, 100,000 such volunteers provide care for nearly 20 million people in the country
  • Mamphela Ramphele, MD, a leading anti-apartheid activist and current executive chair of Circle Capital Ventures, aCape Town-based black economic empowerment company    
  • Sheela Patel, founder and director of a Mumbai-based NGO designed to address the needs of "slumdog's mother" – women living on pavements and in slums in different parts of India

 

Cities affect the health of women all over the globe, from maternal mortality rates in the slums of New Delhi – where a study to be presented at the conference found poor pregnant women were routinely refused admission and denied registration in local hospitals and forced to deliver their babies without proper medical care – to infant mortality rates in America – where another conference session will present data that show infant mortality rates are higher in poorer neighborhoods than national averages.

For more information on how cities impact women's health, visit http://pennicowhi.wordpress.com/  

   

Contact: Joy McIntyre or Artika Rangan

Telephone: 215.898.5074; 215.898.3022

 
 

Email: joymc@nursing.upenn.edu;  artika@nursing.upenn.edu

 
   
   

 

 

SOURCE University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

 


STORY TAGS: urban, women, worldwide, share, health, problems, treatment, condition, city, healthcare, health, black radio network, minority news, minority health news, health news, city health, news, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursin, conference

Video

White House Live Stream
LIVE VIDEO EVERY SATURDAY
alsharpton Rev. Al Sharpton
9 to 11 am EST
jjackson Rev. Jesse Jackson
10 to noon CST


Video

LIVE BROADCASTS
Sounds Make the News ®
WAOK-Urban
Atlanta - WAOK-Urban
KPFA-Progressive
Berkley / San Francisco - KPFA-Progressive
WVON-Urban
Chicago - WVON-Urban
KJLH - Urban
Los Angeles - KJLH - Urban
WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
New York - WKDM-Mandarin Chinese
WADO-Spanish
New York - WADO-Spanish
WBAI - Progressive
New York - WBAI - Progressive
WOL-Urban
Washington - WOL-Urban

Listen to United Natiosns News